Kami Export - Civil Peace Accessible Text without annotaion.pdf

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© by Savvas Learning Company LLC. All Rights Reserved.Natasha Owen/FotoliaNOTESThis version of the selection alternates original text with summarized passages. Dotted lines appear next to the summarized passages.Jonathan Iwegbu counted himself extraordinarily lucky. “Happy survival!” meant so much more to him than just a current fashion of greeting old friends in the first hazy days of peace.Compared to the losses of others after the war between the Hausa1and Biafrans,2Jonathan islucky. He and his wife are alive, as are four of his five children. And, a much smaller piece of luck, his beloved old bicycle has survived. A man claiming to be an officer had tried to steal it, but Jonathan offered him money instead.That night he buried it in the little clearing in the bush where the dead of the camp, including his own youngest son, were buried. When he dug it up again a year later after the surrender all it needed was a little palm-oil greasing.“Nothing puzzles God,” Jonathan says to himself. He begins to use the bike to take camp officials to the nearest road. People want to get rid of their Biafran money, and they are only too happy to pay Jonathan for the ride. After two weeks he has a small fortune in Biafran money. He rides his bike to Enugu and is amazed to find his house still standing.

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