Hendrickson_2000_Clark_Hubbs - HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES Copeia 2000(2 pp 619\u2013622 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES CLARK HUBBS DEAN A HENDRICKSON AND LARK

Hendrickson_2000_Clark_Hubbs - HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES...

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H ISTORICAL P ERSPECTIVES Copeia, 2000(2), pp. 619–622 HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES: CLARK HUBBS D EAN A. H ENDRICKSON AND M ARGARET M. S TEWART Fig. 1. Cathy and Clark Hubbs on vacation in Dub- lin, Ireland, 1999. C LARK Hubbs was born 15 March 1921, in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His parents were Carl Leavitt Hubbs, a noted ichthyologist, and Laura Cornelia Clark Hubbs. Although his mother had both a BA and an MA in mathe- matics from Stanford University, she switched to ichthyology and assisted her husband with his career throughout her life. Hence, early on, Clark was ‘‘imprinted’’ on fishes. Clark’s parents were the major influence on his professional choice. Clark lived in Ann Arbor through a BA de- gree in zoology at the University of Michigan in 1942. He had two siblings, Frances, born in 1919, and Earl, born in 1922. A third child, Mar- garet, born in 1924, died in infancy. Frances married the noted ichthyologist Robert Rush Miller. Earl is a retired high school biology teacher. Thus, the world of fishes was the world they knew and enjoyed. The three children had the run of the Museum of Vertebrate Zoology and often created havoc with all kinds of pranks while their parents concentrated on fishes. Fishes were the center of Hubbs family vaca- tions as well. Clark remembers many fun family field trips from 1928 to 1938. He also noted that his interest was in part monetary from an early age because his father paid the children for their captures of new taxa during the fieldwork. ‘‘The pay was five cents per species collected, one dollar for a new species or subspecies, and five dollars for a new genus.’’ Some trips were more exciting than others. There was the 1938 field trip with their parents in Meadow Valley Wash, Nevada. The washbowl was frozen when they woke up, but at 10:00 AM , it was 86 F. Later, on the same trip, they camped in a city park in Las Vegas. The wind blew down a tree, which hit the family’s tent, narrowly miss- ing crushing them. In 1934, the family was in northwest Nevada where they collected an undescribed tui chub from a small puddle. It was the only specimen they could find at this locality, and Clark recalls his father mentioning that they may have just caused the extinction of that taxon. However, with only one individual, the future of that tax- on was bleak. This was his first recollection of anything about endangered species or conser- vation. Luckily, they found hundreds of the same taxon at the next locality upstream. Clark recalls another humorous story about his father. In 1922, the family was visiting his mother’s family in San Jose, California. While there, David Starr Jordan, unaware they were in San Jose, sent a telegram to Carl Hubbs in Ann Arbor saying he would like to work with him on the Japanese flatfishes. The telegram was for- warded to the grandparents’ house in San Jose, and, much to Jordan’s surprise, Carl appeared in his office ready to go to work three hours after the telegram was sent, appearing as though he had accomplished an impossible feat of rapid travel for the time!

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