King lear 3 - Amanda Lynch King Lear Journal Entry 3 King Lear Act 3 I am definitely taking advantage of the fact that we only have to re-read Act 3

King lear 3 - Amanda Lynch King Lear Journal Entry 3 King...

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Amanda LynchKing Lear Journal Entry 3King Lear Act 3I am definitely taking advantage of the fact that we only have to re-read Act 3 today, so I am just reading over it very slowly so I can catch every detail. Sometimes, however, even reading it very slowly doesn’t help, because sometimes there are just things that I don’t understand no matter how many times I read it. First I wanted to point out the fact that I still do not understand the scene where Kent and the Gentleman are talking, and Kent tells the Gentleman to give Cordelia the ring. I just do not understand the purpose of this scene. He says he is doing that for “confirmation that I am much more than my outwall”, so this must be some way that the Gentleman is supposed to trust Kent more, but I don’t see how giving a ring to Cordelia makes him more trust worthy. I think it is supposed to be saying that if the Gentleman shows Cordelia the ring, she will know that it belongs to Kent and Cordelia will tell the Gentleman good things about Kent? But I don’t understand why Kent wants the Gentleman to trust him more, because I thought that right now, the Gentleman still thinks that Kent is Caius, so I don’t see the reason why Kent wants the Gentleman to trust Kent and not Caius, if Caius is the one talking to the Gentleman anyways. In Scene 2, right in the beginning when the fool is talking to Lear, I feel like there is a sense of defeat when the Fool says “Good nuncle, in, ask thy daughters blessing”. I feel like this is showing a sense of defeat because to me it is just saying that now Lear has to stoop so low as to asking his daughters permission for things, like asking if it’s okay. Asking for their blessing just reminds me of when a man has to ask for his girlfriend’s father’s blessing in order to marry
her. So used in this situation, it is implying that the daughters are the rulers now and they call the shots, because Lear will need their blessing just to even go inside. I do not understand Lear’s response to that, however. After the Fool says his little spiel about asking for the daughters blessing, Lear says that neither rain, wind, thunder, or fire are like his daughters (or at least that’s what I think it meant), but I feel like he would have said that his daughters are kind of like those or something, because those seem dark and can destroy things. But by saying that his daughters are not like those things, I feel like he is saying that they are less bad, which I know for sure that is not what he wanted to say because he is probably pissed at his daughters. Also, he says that he is not accusing them of unkindness, but I thought he was! I thought that is something he would try to do; call them unkind. Also in that same little part, Lear then says “I never have you kingdom, called you children. You owe me no subscription”, and I’m assuming he is talking about his daughters, and then in the footnotes it says that subscription means allegiance, but I feel like they really do owe him allegiance because, against what he just said, he did give them kingdom and called them children at one point. I guess I just don’t understand if this part is supposed to be ironic? Or if he is saying he actually thinks that he didn’t give them kingdom or call them children, and maybe he really does think that they owe him no subscription. But he then says “Here I stand your slave, a poor, infirm, weak, and despised old man”. So I feel like he definitely knows he is getting old and weak, but I also think that this is a sign of him just kind of giving up, which is kind of sad.

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