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ITCC500 Week 2 Assignment Student Example 2

ITCC500 Week 2 Assignment Student Example 2 -...

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Here is a sample of the Week 2 Activity…The usual warnings apply…it is NOT perfect; there are things that are done very well and others that need work….I has made some deletions & alterations. The goal is to provide guidance with the look and feel for how it should be organized NOT the content. Remember I am abundantly aware of the contents of this document so please don’t try to reproduce any part of this document. Dr. Hart
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Trending Toward a Less Safe Internet 1 Trending Toward a Less Safe Internet: A Review of the Literature Research Methods in Information Technology Dr Hart Feb 20, 2011
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Trending Toward a Less Safe Internet 2 Amongst other things, the Internet is a haven for those who wish to exploit the resources of others in some fashion. As soon as a new site goes up, there’s seems to be a hacker waiting in the wings to get in there and carve it up for his own pleasure or financial gain. There are lots of “trends” with respect to Information Technology and it is hypothesized that the trend of the average user is into a more perilous and dangerous Internet experience, particularly with respect to social networking. The following five literature reviews attempt to support this hypothesis of a more dangerous Internet. An article by Bill Brenner (2009) points to a particular security conference in Washington, DC in which 2 researchers demonstrated just how vulnerable even seemingly smart people can be. The general idea is that these social sites get as many people on the same stage, so to speak, as possible. This is a virtual smorgasbord for any potential attacker. The researchers described their ability to use “misfired direct messages on Twitter” (Brenner 2009) to rake in scores of mobile phone numbers, addresses and other info from unsuspecting people. They showed how they can setup fake profiles on LinkedIn.com, for example, send out hundreds of random connection requests and end up with dozens of connected people….REAL people. This type of easy exploitation is far from just being an aberration, however. Malware and phishing has grown at an exponential rate. In an article by Thomas Claburn of Business Week (2009) during the first half of 2009, according to a report by the “Anti-Phishing Working Group” the “number of fake antivirus programs grew by 585%.” Claburn (2009) also described that banking trojans also shot up by 186% and the number of infected computers was up by 66% in 2008-2009, topping almost 12 million. The level of sophistication used by the attackers has improved greatly as well. They need to find more clever ways of coming after your identity, and indeed, your money. In the same Claburn (2009) article he cites a cybercrime report put out by a Finjan which looks into the more sophisticated designs by attackers attempting online banking theft. In the same report, they found that attackers were even becoming better at covering their tracks.
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