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The Free Senior High Policy: An Appropriate Replacement to The Progressive Free Senior High Policy Nurudeen Abdul-Rahaman 1* , Abdul Basit Abdul Rahaman 2 , Wan Ming 1 , Abdul-Rahim Ahmed 1 , Abdul-Rahaman S. Salma 1 1 University of Science and Technology of China 2 Ghana Education Service, Ghana Corresponding author: Nurudeen Abdul-Rahaman, E-mail: [email protected] ABSTRACT Governments all over the world have been improving their educational sector through funding programs aimed at reducing the financial burden on parents, increasing access and quality to education. The government of Ghana in 2017 switched policy to a free senior high school policy to reduce poverty by finally eliminating the financial burdens parents face in paying their children’s fees. This study seeks to evaluate the appropriateness of the free senior high policy in replacing the pre-existing progressive free policy. The questionnaire survey was used to collect primary data for this study. The descriptive statistics were used in analyzing the data of this study. A total number of Two hundred (200) responses were retrieved, and out of those retrieved, 57 were females, and 143 were males. All 200 responses were usable in this study. The free senior high policy proved to put more butts on seats in helping to reduce financial burdens on parents than the pre-existing progressive free policy since nothing is paid by parents or guardians. Key words: Free Senior High Policy, Government Funding, Progressive Free Senior High Policy, Poverty INTRODUCTION “Sustained poverty reduction requires a commitment to re - duce inequality and improve access to opportunities for all citizens” (World Bank, 2015). Ghana’s rural development and urbanization have led to a significant poverty reduc - tion in the southern part of the country. However, the rate of poverty is still very high in northern Ghana. Between 1992 and 2006, the number of poor people decreased by 2.5 million in the southern part and increased by 900,000 in the Northern, Upper East, and Upper West regions of Ghana. Poverty remains endemic in the northern areas of the country, with the poverty rate standing at 87.9 percent for Upper West in 2006. The Upper West was the poorest among the ten regions of Ghana, where the rate of poverty shot up from 38.8% in 1999 to 48% in 2005/2006 (GSS, 2007). It has led the World Bank to declare that Ghana’s success story in poverty reduction is the success story of its southern parts only (World Bank 2011). In bridging the enrollment gap between the rich and poor, the government introduced the free compulsory basic education which is a constitutional requirement. It covers eleven years of univer - sal basic education which include two years of kindergarten, six years of primary, and three years of junior high school.

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