special-forces-uw-tc-18-01

Planners generically use the term resistance to

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Unformatted text preview: stance” to categorize the activities of a resistance movement or insurgency. Insurgents are inherently indigenous. There remains confusion regarding external support elements, such as foreign fighters. Even when the U.S. forces or foreign fighters support an insurgency or resistance movement, planners should not categorize them as part of the insurgency. Planners should categorize these elements as enablers, facilitators, advisors, or supporters. WHY POPULATIONS RESIST 2-1. Resistance generally begins with the desire of individuals to remove intolerable conditions imposed by an unpopular regime or occupying power. Feelings of opposition toward the governing authority and hatred of existing conditions that conflict with the individual’s values, interests, aspirations, and way of life spread from the individual to his family, close friends, and neighbors. As a result, an entire community may possess an obsessive hatred for the established authority. Initially, this hatred will manifest as sporadic, spontaneous nonviolent and violent acts of resistance by the people toward authority. As the discontent grows, natural leaders, such as former military personnel, clergymen, local office holders, and neighborhood representatives, emerge to channel this discontent into organized resistance that promotes its growth. The population must believe they have nothing to lose, or more to gain. Key to transitioning from growing discontent to insurrection is the perception by a significant portion of the population that they have nothing to lose by revolting and the belief that they can succeed. In addition, there must be a spark that triggers insurrection, such as a catalyzing event that ignites popular support against the government power and a dynamic insurgent leadership that is able to exploit the situation. Figure 2-1, page 2-2, defines words critical to understanding resistance movements. 30 November 2010 TC 18-01 2-1 Chapter 2 Figure 2-1. Resistance terminology 2-2 TC 18-01 30...
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