0PO;L7L;;'.docx - MLA The Patriot Act The Freedom Act Close...

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MLA The Patriot Act - The Freedom Act Close Read 1 - Complete Common Lit. Close Read 2 - Highlight in yellow key details of the Patriot Act . - Highlight in blue key details for the Freedom Act. Close Read 3 - Evaluate the argument and complete the tasks at the of the text. Questioning authority is as American as apple pie. From the tax-averse Sons of Liberty in Boston, who defied the Tea Act of 1773 by dumping a shipload of tea into the sea, to pacifist Jeanette Rankin, the first woman elected to Congress who on December 8, 1941 cast the sole vote against the U.S. declaration of war on Japan, and to Occupy Wall Street, a self- described “leaderless resistance movement” that four days after the 2016 elections called for “A people’s assembly to elect and swear in an alternative American ‘government in exile’” – Americans have never been reluctant to question their government’s actions. Most Americans are grateful to have that constitutional right, and are proud that throughout the country’s history, that right has been usually put to a good use. But sometimes people forget that protests can have serious consequences, and must consider whether all objections are fair and necessary. These questions deserve to be raised when considering a weighty and highly controversial issue: the vehement rejection of certain security measures that Congress adopted after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. In recent years, some of these laws that were passed for the protection of the American people came under severe and often emotionally charged scrutiny for their alleged threat to personal freedom. The heart of the controversy was the “USA PATRIOT Act” that Congress enacted in October 2001 to enable the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and the National Security Agency (NSA) to collect information they considered to be potentially helpful in preventing future terrorist attacks. The bipartisan law had been proposed after President George W. Bush, standing on the ruins of the Twin Towers, declared “a war on terrorism.” The act was quickly endorsed by all but two of the 100 U.S. Senators and 357 of the 435 members of the U.S. House of Representatives. RESISTANCE TO THE PATRIOT ACT As long as the act was enforced out of the public’s view, it caused no controversy. But after its existence and extent were made public in 2013 by WikiLeaks – an organization that specializes in publishing government secrets –
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