Lect13_notes

The most common form of the correction equation in

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Unformatted text preview: ensities for elements not wanted in fit –  e.g. that might be present as a result of a gold coating on the sample •  Apply ZAF corrections –  Iterative calculation - guess answer and converge on a good result –  With standards or standard-less approaches CBEMS 164 – XRD, SEM & Microanalysis: Lecture 13 ! 30 Atomic Number, Absorption and Fluorescence Effects! For conceptual as well as calculation-based reasons, it is useful to divide the matrix effects into those due to atomic number, Z, x-ray absorption, A, and x-ray fluorescence, F. The most common form of the correction equation in quantitative analysis is then: !' % ! " "#$ #' ' ! " "#$ #' & !! ' " %! ' " This equation must be applied separately for each element present in the sample. Therefore, the Z, A, and F effects must be calculated separately for each element in the sample. It is important to develop a good understanding of the origin and the importance of each of the three major effects on x-ray measurement for quantitative analysis. CBEMS 164 – XRD, SEM & Microanalysis: Lecture 13 ! 31 CBEMS 164 – XRD, SEM & M...
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2014 for the course CBEMS 164 taught by Professor Porter,j during the Fall '08 term at UC Irvine.

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