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memory-sizing-for-server-virtualization

memory-sizing-for-server-virtualization - White Paper Intel...

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White Paper Intel Information Technology Computer Manufacturing Server Virtualization Memory Sizing for Server Virtualization Intel IT has standardized on 16 gigabytes (GB) of memory for dual-socket virtualization hosts. We based this decision on extensive analysis of maximum physical memory consumption on more than 3,000 servers running non-virtualized workloads in our business computing environment. We found that approximately half of these servers consume 1 GB of memory or less. For workloads of this size, we believe that we can achieve high consolidation ratios of up to 15-20 to 1 using low-cost dual-socket virtualization hosts based on quad-core processors. We expect that this strategy will minimize cost because we avoid paying for unused memory and associated power and cooling. Sudip Chahal and Todd Glasgow, Intel Corporation July 2007 [email protected]
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± White Paper Memory Sizing for Server Virtualization Executive Summary Intel IT has standardized on 16 gigabytes (GB) of memory for dual-socket virtualization hosts. We based this decision on extensive analysis of maximum physical memory consumption on more than 3,000 servers running non-virtualized workloads in our business computing environment. We found that approximately half of these servers consume 1 GB of memory or less. For workloads of this size, we believe that we can achieve high consolidation ratios of up to 15-20 to 1 using low-cost dual-socket virtualization hosts based on quad-core processors and configured with 16 GB of memory. To determine optimum memory size for virtualization host servers, we monitored maximum physical memory consumption on more than 3,000 business systems at Intel and compared the results with data from other companies. We reconciled the actual memory consumption information with available memory configurations and costs to determine optimum memory size for the virtualization hosts. We found that: Memory utilization can vary widely, even within similar workload categories. Excluding the upper 25 percent, or top quartile, the servers sampled used an average of 1 GB of memory. Utilization patterns were similar at the other companies. 2 GB dual in-line memory modules (DIMMs) represented the best tradeoff of capacity, power, and cost. Dual-socket servers with quad-core processors and 16 GB of memory can support 15 to 20 virtual machines (VMs) for most applications that are virtualization candidates in the near- to mid-term. Our analysis shows the importance of monitoring actual memory use when determining optimum virtualization host memory size. We believe our memory sizing strategy will minimize cost because we avoid paying for unused memory and associated power and cooling. We believe we can achieve consolidation ratios of up to 15-±0 to 1 using dual-socket virtualization hosts with quad-core processors and 16 GB of memory.
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² Memory Sizing for Server Virtualization White Paper Contents Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. ± Business Challenge .................................................................................................................................................. 4 Determining Virtualization Host Memory Size ...................................................................................... 5
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