Psy 123_Lec 17 Conscious Free Will

1999a a concreteabstract discrimination task kiehl

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Unformatted text preview: d during a motor preparation task (Forth and Hare, 1989), an emotional lexical decision task (Williamson et al., 1991), a concrete/abstract lexical decision task (Kiehl et al., 1999a), a concrete/abstract discrimination task (Kiehl et al., 1999a), an emotional polarity discrimination task (Kiehl et al., 1999a), a visual oddball task (Kiehl et al., 1999b), an auditory oddball task (Kiehl et al., in press-a), and a Go/No Go response inhibition task (Kiehl et al., 2000b). All figures are adapted to approximately the same time scale and amplitude (negative plotted up), and are from frontal or central electrode sites. ! Does Free Will Exist?! Can we assign personal responsibility to an individual with abnormal brain functioning?! Does Free Will Exist?! Can we assign personal responsibility to an individual with abnormal brain functioning?! Can neuroimaging be used to determine whether or not an individual has a psychopathic mind? Individual differences in task-related brain activity can be explained by differences in:! -Personality (e.g., extrovert)! - State of mind (e.g., coffee, sleep, etc.)! - Cognitive strategy (e.g., biases)! - Cognitive Style (e.g., visualizer, verbalizer)! - Baseline activity (default mode network)! - Anatomical connectivity ! - Miller et al. (2009), (2012)! Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience (2002) Does Free Will Exist?! Can we assign personal responsibility to an individual with abnormal brain functioning?! What if most of our actions are carried out before we are consciously aware of them? Does Free Will Exist?! Can we assign personal responsibility to an individual with abnormal brain functioning?! What if most of our actions are carried out before we are consciously aware of them? “The human interpreter has set us up for a fall. It has created the illusion of self and, with it, the sense we humans have agency and ‘freely’ make decisions about our actions. In many ways it is a terrific and positive capacity for humans to possess. With increasing intelligence and with a capacity to see relationships beyond what is immediately and perceptually apparent, how long would it be before our species began to wonder what it all meant – what was the meaning of life? The interpreter provides the storyline and narrative, and we all believe we are agents acting of our own free will, making important choices. The illusion is so powerful that there is no amount of analysis that will change our sensation that we are all acting willfully and with purpose. The simple truth is that even the most strident determinists and fatalists at the personal psychological level do not actually believe they are pawns in the brain’s chess game.” ! Mike Gazzaniga in! Who’s in Charge?: Free Will and the Science of the Brain!...
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