1389639061_229__02Phonetics_S2%25252C3%25252C4Spring2014_C1

A rimrott 2013 simon fraser 83 university andor t

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Unformatted text preview: X VOWELS –  Produced with more relaxed speech muscle movement –  Less vocal tract constric7on –  Shorter © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 66 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Tense vs. Lax Vowels CONT. LIP POSITION –  For tense vowels, lips are more rounded or more spread TONGUE BODY POSITION –  For tense vowels, tongue is in higher posi7on © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 67 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Examples: Tense vs. Lax Vowels TENSE heat [i] LAX hit [ɪ] shoot [u] should [ʊ] mate [ej] met [ɛ] Study Table 2.15 on p. 38 © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 68 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU The Schwa [ə] •  Mid- central unrounded lax reduced vowel •  Briefer dura7on than any other vowel •  Ar7cula7on: At mid- point in terms of both height and frontness about, hinted, collide [ə] © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 69 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Canadian Raising •  For many Canadians, /aj/ and /aw/ ‘turn into’ [ʌj] and [ʌw] before a voiceless consonant •  Compare the pronuncia7on of: eyes fly to house loud [ajs] [flaj] [haws] [lawd] ice flight a house lout © A. Rimrott, 2014 [ʌjs] [flʌjt] [hʌws] [lʌwt] Syllabic Liquids and Nasals •  Liquids and nasals are so sonorous that they may func7on as syllabic nuclei thimble [ θ ɪ̃ m b l̩ ] [email protected] [ b a ɾ m̩ ] bird [ b ɚ d ] or [ b ɹ̩ d ] •  Nasals and liquids become syllabic word- finally when preceded by a consonant •  Diacri7c: Ver7cal line right underneath the segment (for technical reasons, the line is not right underneath some segments shown above, but it should be right underneath the segment, not to the side of it) © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 71 Unive...
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2014 for the course LING 220 taught by Professor Heift during the Spring '09 term at Simon Fraser.

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