1389639061_229__02Phonetics_S2%25252C3%25252C4Spring2014_C1

Rimrott 2013 simon fraser 35 university andor t heift

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Unformatted text preview: the pharynx © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 27 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Consonants vs. Vowels •  Ar&culatory differences •  Consonants: Produced with complete closure or narrowing of vocal tract à༎ airflow is blocked or impeded •  Vocal folds may or may not vibrate during ar7cula7on •  Vowels: Airflow is free •  Vocal folds vibrate during ar7cula7on •  Acous&c differences •  Vowels are more sonorous than consonants, that is, they are perceived as louder and longer sounds © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 28 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Consonants vs. Vowels Func&onal differences •  Vowels –  Func7on as the nucleus of a syllable –  Are syllabic (due to their greater sonority) •  Consonants –  Do not func7on as nucleus of a syllable •  Note: Some consonants may be syllabic – we’ll discuss this later © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Glides •  Also called semivowels or semiconsonants •  Vowel- like in ar7cula7on but pa@ern as consonants •  Ar7cula7on is similar to vowel ar7cula7on but moves rapidly to another ar7cula7on or is quickly terminated •  Momentary ar7cula7on! •  Examples: we, yes © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 30 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Consonants •  The three dimensions of consonant produc7on are •  Place of ar7cula7on •  Manner of ar7cula7on •  State of the vocal folds: voiced or voiceless © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 31 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Place of Ar7cula7on: Where? •  Each point at which the airstream can be modified to produce a different sound –  Labial, Labiodental –  Dental, Interdental –  Alveolar –  Alveopalatal, Palatal –  Velar –  Uvular –  Pharyngeal –  Glo@al © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Manner of Ar7cula7on •  Lips, tongue, velum and gloos can be posi7oned in different ways to produce different sound types –  These configura7ons are called manners of ar7cula7on •  Stop, Nasal, Frica7ve, Affricate, Liquid, Glide © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Oral and Nasal Sounds •  Oral sounds •  Air flows through only the oral tract •  Nasal...
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This note was uploaded on 01/20/2014 for the course LING 220 taught by Professor Heift during the Spring '09 term at Simon Fraser.

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