1389639061_229__02Phonetics_S2%25252C3%25252C4Spring2014_C1

Rimrott 2013 simon fraser 45 university andor t heift

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Unformatted text preview: sounds •  Velum is lowered, allowing air to pass through nasal passages © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 34 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Manners of Ar7cula7on •  STOPS •  Consonants produced with a complete closure of airflow in the vocal tract STOPS Oral Stops (plosives) Nasal Stops (nasals) © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 35 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU English Stop Consonants •  Places of ar7cula7on •  Bilabial •  Alveolar •  Velar •  Glo@al © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 36 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Bilabial Stops •  Oral spin [p] voiceless bin [b] voiced •  Nasal make [m] voiced Closure in oral cavity is made with both lips © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 37 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Alveolar Stops •  Oral stick [t] voiceless deep [d] voiced •  Nasal nose [n] voiced Oral cavity is blocked by placing blade of tongue against alveolar ridge © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 38 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Velar Stops •  Oral scar [k] voiceless go [g] voiced •  Nasal sing [ŋ] voiced Oral cavity is blocked by placing back of tongue against velum © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 39 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Glo@al Stop _uh_uh [ʔʌʔʌ] (meaning “no”) –  The glo@al stop is the sound before each vowel here –  The vowels here are each preceded by a momentary closing of the airstream at the gloos –  The vocal folds are pressed together and a voiceless sound is produced: [ʔ] © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fraser 40 University, and/or © T. Heift, © M. Taboada, © C. Burgess, SFU Aspirated Stops •  Voiceless stops are aspirated at the beginning of a stressed syllable (but not a\er [s]) –  A\er release of stop, you can hear a lag (brief delay) before voicing of following vowel –  This lag is accompanied by a release of air, which is called aspira7on pin [ph] aspirated voiceless bilabial stop spin [p] voiceless bilabial stop See Figures 2.6, 2.7 and 2.8 on pp. 29- 30 © A. Rimrott, 2013, Simon Fras...
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