{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Lab 4 - Solubility Rules - Lab 4 Solubility Rules Contents...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/15/13 Lab 4 - Solubility Rules www.webassign.net/ebooks/wsugencheml1/lab_4/manual.html 1/5 Contents > Lab 4 - Solubility Rules Lab 4 - Solubility Rules Purpose To develop a set of solubility rules. Goals To observe trends in solubility and exceptions to these trends. To write chemical formulas based on cation/anion charges. To learn to write net ionic equations. Introduction Chemical reactions can be classified into five major classes: 1 Combination or Synthesis (formation) reactions: Two substances combine to form a compound. The generic expression is: ( 1 ) A + B → C Examples of such reactions include: ( 2 ) 2 Ca + O 2 → 2 CaO ( 3 ) N 2 + 3 H 2 → 2 NH 3 2 Decomposition reactions: The opposite of a combination reaction, a compound breaks apart to form two or more products. The generic expression is: ( 4 ) AB → A + B Examples of such reactions include: ( 5 ) CaCO 3 → CaO + CO 2 ( 6 )
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
4/15/13 Lab 4 - Solubility Rules www.webassign.net/ebooks/wsugencheml1/lab_4/manual.html 2/5 2 H 2 O → 2 H 2 + O 2 3 Single Displacement Reactions: One element, ion, or functional group displaces another element, ion, or functional group from a compound. The generic expression is: ( 7 ) A + BC → AC + B Some examples include: ( 8 ) Cu + 2 HNO 3 → Cu(NO 3 ) 2 + H 2 ( 9 ) Zn + 2 HCl → ZnCl 2 + H 2 4 Double Displacement or Metathesis Reactions: The atoms or ions in two or more different substances change places to form new compounds. The generic expression is: ( 10 ) AB + CD → AD + CB Some examples include: ( 11 ) HC 2 H 3 O 2 ( aq ) + NaOH( aq ) → NaC 2 H 3 O 2 ( aq ) + H 2 O ( 12 ) Pb(NO 3 ) 2 ( aq ) + 2 KI( aq ) → PbI 2 ( aq ) + 2 KNO 3 ( aq ) Double displacement reactions fall into at least two major subclasses. Equation 11 shows one of them, a neutralization reaction between an acid and a base. Equation 12 shows another, a precipitation reaction. Soluble species (generally ions) react to form insoluble solid compounds that are called precipitates . 5 Electron Transfer or Redox reactions: Electrons are transferred from one substance to another. These will be treated separately in this lab course. In this experiment, we will work with precipitation reactions involving ions. Ionic solids dissolve in water by a process known as dissolution . If an appreciable amount of the solid dissolves, it is said to be soluble . The ions are solvated by water, and free to move independently of each other in the solution. When two aqueous solutions of ionic substances are mixed, the mobile ions in each solution interact with each other. Coulomb's law describes the interaction between the ions (charged particles).
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern