Wood___Roberts_2011_Tradional_Economic_G

Exercise 21 c onclusions p resent day economic

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Unformatted text preview: er, their approach: building abstract models based o n a ssuming away t he messy complications o f t he so-called ' real w orld,' has fallen distinctly o ut o f favor. Nonetheless, for the first three decades following the e nd o f World W ar T wo , economic geography enjoyed a period o f d ynamic growth based almost entirely o n t he insights o f these G erman theorists. The w ork o f this later generation o f p ostwar geographers is c onsidered more fully in the next c hapter. Suffice to say for now, t hat t heir w ork was foundational t o A nglophone e conomic geography. W hile e conomic geographers com­ monly give traditional location theory little m ore t han a F or t his exercise use i nformation a bout t hree b asic agricultural products (provided in Table 2.2) t o d etermine t he o ptimal l and use p attern t hat w ould s urround a c entral marketplace. First calculate the economic o r l and rent associated with each p roduct a t t hree different locations: t he m arket itself; a location 10 k m f rom t he m arket; a nd a l ocation 2 0km from the market. L and r ent = Yield x (price - cost) - Yield x ( Transport rate x distance). Using the three points plot a straight-line rent graph for each o f the three crops (see Figure 2.1). Using the rent graph determine the optimal pattern o f agricultural land use sur­ rounding the central marketplace. You should have a clear indication o f the boundaries separating the three crops. O nce you have determined the optimal land use pattern modifY the price o f t he crops, p lot a second rent graph a nd n ote h ow t he changes impact o n t he optimal land use pattern. Table 2 .2 Data for three agricultural products Crop Yield Unit Price Unit Cost Transport Rate Apples Figure 2.12 Loschian landscape N ote: City-rich sectors are shaded. Source: based o n G arner 1967 : 31 7 . 15 pounds $ 30 $ 15 $ 3.00/km Potatoes 3 0 pounds $ 15 $ 10 $ 0.25/km W heat 2 0 bushels $23 $ 20 $ 0.05/km Source : Authors . 33 TRADITIONAL LOCATION THEORY 32 TRADITIONAL ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHIES level i n t he u rban hierarchy will produce quite different combinations o f goods. The specification o f city-rich a nd c ity-poor regions also allows for the development o f sub­ regions with differing densities o f p opulation. I n effect, Losch developed a variable K model t hat was more flexible t han Christaller's K = 3 a nd so o n specifications and, as some analysts point out, Losch's more complex a nd flexible model w ith its rotating 'nets' o f hexagons could be said t o fit a greater n umber o f actual cases. Losch's b ook was to prove foundational for the eco­ nomic ( and urban) geographers o f t he later 1950s a nd 1 960s i n t he English speaking world. H is c ommitments to a general theory - to figuring o ut h ow space a nd t he laws o f economic behavior interacted - and to a geometrical a nd m athematical m ethod, were deeply influential. cursory acknowledgment, we see significant value in these theorists a nd t heir ideas, in p art t o u nderstand t he development o f the body o f knowledge k nown as economic geography. M ore b roadly though, they represent early a ttempts t o u nderstand a nd e xplain t he s patiality o f capitalism. H ow does the capitalist economy, whether rural o r u rban, agricultural o r industrial, relate t o space? W hat role does space play in the workings o f capitalism a nd w hat kinds o f spatial arrangements a nd flows are associated with its development? Such basic questions have never left economic geography. They still p rompt e conomic geog­ raphers a nd lie b ehind t he t remendous d iversity o f a pproaches t hat n ow characterize a nd enliven the field. EXERCISE 2.1 C ONCLUSIONS P resent day economic geographers c ommonly fail t o see the value in the contributions made by the early G erman l ocation theorists introduced in this chapter. O ur w orld is certainly very different from that o f each o f t he thinkers we have considered. Moreover, their approach: building abstract models based o n a ssuming away t he messy complications o f t he so-called ' real w orld,' has fallen distinctly o ut o f favor. Nonetheless, for the first three decades following the e nd o f World W ar T wo , economic geography enjoyed a period o f d ynamic growth based almost entirely o n t he insights o f these G erman theorists. The w ork o f this later generation o f p ostwar geographers is c onsidered more fully in the next c hapter. Suffice to say for now, t hat t heir w ork was foundational t o A nglophone e conomic geography. W hile e conomic geographers com­ monly give traditional location theory little m ore t han a F or t his exercise use i nformation a bout t hree b asic agricultural products (provided in Table 2.2) t o d etermine t he o ptimal l and use p attern t hat w ould s urround a c entral marketplace. First calculate the economic o r l and rent associated with each p roduct a t t hree different locations: t he m arket itself; a location 10 k m f rom t he m arket; a nd a l ocation 2 0km from the market. L and r e...
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This document was uploaded on 01/24/2014.

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