Lecture+11

Salting ripening

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Unformatted text preview: of the enzyme is called rennin or chymosin. MILK Rennet WHEY CURD (liquid) Cheese making ‐basic steps common to most cheese varieties (rennet‐coagulated cheeses; McGee p.59‐61) ‐ acidification (Lactic acid bacteria) ‐ coagulation (rennet) These represent about 75% ‐ dehydration of total cheese production. ‐ salting ‐ ripening Cheese ripening. Fresh cheeses undergo a series of transformations due to the activity of many microbial enzymes. Such transformations lead to the development of characteristic flavors and textures of different cheeses (McGee p.61). Swiss cheese: Propionibacter shermanii is the “hole‐maker”. Cheese holes result from bubbles of carbon dioxide produced by P.shermanii (McGee p.58). Blue cheeses: characteristic blue veins due to the growth of blue molds, such as Penicillium roqueforti and Penicillium glaucum (McGee p.59). ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………...
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This note was uploaded on 01/25/2014 for the course MAT 1 taught by Professor Higgins during the Fall '13 term at UC Davis.

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