Your people must be committed to your plan establish

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Unformatted text preview: reate commitment within your team: • Use the SWOT to start discussion. SWOT brings team members into the strategic discussion. It makes strategy understandable. Your managers have to be part of the team that discusses strategy. CHAPTER 5: GROWING YOUR BUSINESS 5.5 • Make the budgeting elements of the planning process visible. Managers should see what their peers are spending and should hear why. One of the best things I ever watched, as a consultant, was a management group that argued over the activity budgets during the planning process. Each manager had to defend his or her budget, showing what sales and marketing budgets would come out of it. There was a lot of peer pressure. • Make sure people know that actual results will be compared to plan. With time, in a company that uses the planning process, this becomes second nature. In the beginning, however, it is extremely important that the main company owners and operators set the standards by scheduling plan review meetings each month and attending them. This has to be important. The bottom line here is that the planning process, for a growing company, is about the people more than the plan. Not only does everything have to be measurable, but it also has to be measured after the fact, and tracked, and managed. Your people must be committed to your plan. Establish Regular Plan Reviews Each year, as you get ready to publish the next year’s plan, schedule the plan review meetings. Use some regular meeting schedule, such as the third or fourth Thursday of every month. All the managers committed to the plan will know about the schedule ahead of time, so there are few reasons to miss a meeting. Some excuses will come up. There will be events like trade shows or client events that some managers have to attend. However, with a preplanned schedule for review meetings, these problems won’t happen that often. If your planning process includes a good plan — with specific responsibilities assigned, managers committed, budgets, dates, and measurability — then the review meetings become easier to manage and eas...
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2014 for the course BUINESS 102 taught by Professor Unknown during the Winter '09 term at University of Phoenix.

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