EXCEL DATA ANALYSIS MODELING AND SIMULATION-SPRINGER pdf.pdf

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Excel Data Analysis
Hector Guerrero Excel Data Analysis Modeling and Simulation 123
Dr. Hector Guerrero Mason School of Business College of William & Mary Williamsburg, VA 23189 USA [email protected] ISBN 978-3-642-10834-1 e-ISBN 978-3-642-10835-8 DOI 10.1007/978-3-642-10835-8 Springer Heidelberg Dordrecht London New York Library of Congress Control Number: 2010920153 © Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010 This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved, whether the whole or part of the material is concerned, specifically the rights of translation, reprinting, reuse of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilm or in any other way, and storage in data banks. Duplication of this publication or parts thereof is permitted only under the provisions of the German Copyright Law of September 9, 1965, in its current version, and permission for use must always be obtained from Springer. Violations are liable to prosecution under the German Copyright Law. The use of general descriptive names, registered names, trademarks, etc. in this publication does not imply, even in the absence of a specific statement, that such names are exempt from the relevant protective laws and regulations and therefore free for general use. Cover design : WMXDesign GmbH, Heidelberg Printed on acid-free paper Springer is part of Springer Science+Business Media ()
To my wonderful parents . . . Paco and Nena
Preface Why does the World Need— Excel Data Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation ? When spreadsheets first became widely available in the early 1980s, it spawned a revolution in teaching. What previously could only be done with arcane software and large scale computing was now available to the common-man , on a desktop. Also, before spreadsheets, most substantial analytical work was done outside the classroom where the tools were; spreadsheets and personal computers moved the work into the classroom. Not only did it change how the analysis curriculum was taught, but it also empowered students to venture out on their own to explore new ways to use the tools. I can’t tell you how many phone calls, office visits, and/or emails I have received in my teaching career from ecstatic students crowing about what they have just done with a spreadsheet model. I have been teaching courses related to spreadsheet based analysis and modeling for about 25 years and I have watched and participated in the spreadsheet revolution. During that time, I have been a witness to the following observations: Each year has led to more and more demand for Excel based analysis and modeling skills, both from students, practitioners, and recruiters Excel has evolved as an ever more powerful suite of tools, functions, and capabilities, including the recent iteration and basis for this book—Excel 2007 The ingenuity of Excel users to create applications and tools to deal with complex problems continues to amaze me Those students that preceded the spreadsheet revolution often find themselves at a loss as to where to go for an introduction to what is commonly taught to most many undergraduates in business and sciences.

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