Plato Locke - Plato's"Theory of Forms and John Locke's...

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Plato’s “Theory of Forms” and John Locke’s resemblance thesis are two very plausible accounts, but can also be argued. Plato claims that the names people give to the physical objects that we can see are actually the names of objects that we cannot see. While John Locke’s resemblance thesis states that ideas in the mind resemble objects in the world. Locke expresses this idea by breaking objects down into primary and secondary qualities. Although Locke's thesis is very reasonable it is also problematic because each person can have different views of what an objects primary and secondary qualities are. In Plato’s Republic , he uses the Allegory of the Cave to explain his “Theory of Forms.” A group of prisoners are chained in a cave, unable to turn their heads, and can see nothing but the wall of the cave directly in front of them. Behind them is a fire, and a parapet where puppeteers are able to walk and perform puppet shows. The prisoners are unable to see the puppets, but are able to see and hear shadows and echoes caste by the
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course PHI 101 taught by Professor Perkins during the Spring '08 term at Canisius College.

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Plato Locke - Plato's"Theory of Forms and John Locke's...

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