SCHWEITZER_LAB_1

These values were compared to the original

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Unformatted text preview: Table 1.1: Origin to Start/End Position Measurement Next, a rubber band was placed at start 1 and stretched to end 1. All obstacles were ignored. The result was vector r11. Rubber bands were then used to find the x and y components of r11. After finding these values, a vector pathway was created from start 1 to end 1, this time, avoiding all obstacles. The magnitude and direction of each vector in the pathway was measured and eventually used to calculate the total displacement. These values were compared to the original measurements for r11. We then used this procedure to find the displacement vectors and vector pathways between start 1 and end 2 ( r12), start 2 and end 1 ( r21), and start 2 and end 2 ( r22). A summary of the data gathered can be found in the tables below. 3 4 Data Analysis and Questions 1. Determine the magnitude and angle for your displacement vectors from the addition of the multiple path vectors. How does it compare to your measured values? To determine the magnitude and angle for the displacement vectors from the addition of the multiple path vectors, we initially find the sums of the x  ­ components and y ­components, using the equation, Vc= VA + VB = Vcx + Vcy = (VAX + VBX) + (VAY + VBY) found in the lab manual. Then, we use the Pythagorean theorem and trigonometric equations found in figure c to compute the magnitude of the displacement vector and the vector position. The values obtained are shown in the table below. As the table shows, the magnitude and angles for the displacement vectors from the addition of the multiple path vectors we calculated are very close to our 5 measured values. Ideally, if all measurements were done perfectly, they would be equal. See calculation details for additional reference and percent errors. 2. When your multiple path vectors are added together graphically on the Excel spreadsheet, does their sum appear equal to the original displacement vector (eg. r11)? No. When the path vectors are added together graphically their sum does not equal the magnitude of the original displacement vector . The vectors themselves will not add up to the original displacement; it is the vector path components that must be used to graphically find this value. 3. When the x and y components of the multiple path vectors are added together, does their sum appear equal to the vector components of the original displacement vector? Yes, when the x and y components of the multiple vectors are added together, the values appear to very similar in magnitude the x and y components...
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2014 for the course PHYS PHYS-1210 taught by Professor Dr.norton during the Fall '13 term at Tulane.

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