Chapter08c - Air Pressure and Winds III Due to the rotation...

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Air Pressure and Winds III
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Coriolis Force (Effect) It is an apparent force; Due to the rotation of the coordinate system (Earth); It makes a moving object deflect from a straight line even in the absence of any forces acting on it.
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Coriolis Force Demonstration Rotating table A B Dashed line - the trajectory of the chalk with respect to a non-rotating table. Solid line - the trajectory of the chalk with respect to a rotating table.
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The Magnitude of the Coriolis Force The rotation of the Earth The faster the planet rotates the bigger the force The speed of the object Bigger V -> bigger effect The latitude : Min. at the equator Max. at the poles φ sin 2 V m F co =
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φ sin 2 V m F co = The speed of the object The latitude : Min. at the equator Max. at the poles Coriolis force as a function of:
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The Direction of the Coriolis Force In the Northern hemisphere the deflection is to the right of the direction of motion. In the Southern hemisphere the deflection is to the left of the direction of motion. The winds in the Northern hemisphere will be deflected to the right and in the Southern hemisphere they will be deflected to the left. Hurricanes spin differently in the Northern and Southern hemisphere
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The Coriolis Force and the Earth The Coriolis effect is important when moving over LARGE distances (air plane travel), with large velocities, away from the equator.
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course MET 1010 taught by Professor Matchev during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter08c - Air Pressure and Winds III Due to the rotation...

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