A segmented copper sleeve called a commutator resides

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Unformatted text preview: er sleeve, called a commutator, resides on the axle of a BDC motor. As the motor turns, carbon brushes slide over the commutator, coming in contact with different segments of the commutator. The segments are attached to different rotor windings, therefore, a dynamic magnetic field is generated inside the motor when a voltage is applied across the brushes of the motor. It is important to note that the brushes and commutator are the parts of a BDC motor that are most prone to wear because they are sliding past each other. Shunt-wound Brushed DC (SHWDC) motors have the field coil in parallel (shunt) with the armature. The current in the field coil and the armature are independent of one another. As a result, these motors have excellent speed control. SHWDC motors are typically used in applications that require five or more horsepower. Loss of magnetism is not an issue in SHWDC motors so they are generally more robust than PMDC motors. TYPES OF STEPPING MOTORS As mentioned earlier, the way the stationary magnetic field is produced in the stator differentiates the various types of BDC motors. This section will...
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2014 for the course AA AA taught by Professor Aa during the Winter '10 term at ENS Cachan.

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