ETH-230-OL010 - CSC -.docx - 1 Looking for Ethics in the...

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1 Looking for Ethics in the Chinese Social Credit System 11Oct2020 Thomas Edison State University ETH-230-OL010
2 Attempting to get the entirety of a society of 1.5 billion people on the same page is a difficult task. China has tried to reign in its people in many ways throughout the years, with the Chinese Social Credit (CSC) system being their most recent attempt. Being that it is a method to coerce its people into following governmental desires, it is hard to find, as an outsider, any modicum of ethical value in this Orwellian form of control. In short, I like the idea of being able to know more about the person you are in dealings with before meeting them. However, the level of access presented is hard to accept. The very concept presented in the CSC flies in the face of the virtue ethics of Aristotle and downplays the deontological stance taken by Kant. “Virtue theory emphasizes the value of virtuous qualities rather than formal rules or useful results.” (Schmitz, 2012) This statement alone effectively stands as an adversary to the concept of the CSC. Far be it for me to say what one should consider being virtuous, but how can one search for ‘eudaimonia’ while falling under the constraints of a totalitarian regime? The purpose of CSC is control. It effectively splits society into different classes, all based on the person’s current score. Utilitarianism supports this idea of social control. If all are striving to get higher scores, then all citizens will do what is best for the greater good. The rewards are

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