Chapter 1 Outline - Chapter 1 The Nature of Myth I What is a myth A Term myth 1 Mythos originally meant"authoritative speech"story or"plot 2 Myth a

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Chapter 1 The Nature of Myth I) What is a myth? A) Term myth 1) Mythos originally meant “authoritative speech,” “story,” or “plot” 2) Myth – a traditional story with collective importance B) Myths as stories 1) Accept that there is plot, narrative structure (beginning, middle, end) 2) Typical beginning – introduced to characters, situation arises (a) Character – comes from a word meaning “a certain mental imprint,” the sum of the choices one makes 3) Middle – situation grows more complex, tension and conflict develop 4) End – tension somehow resolved C) Not just a story 1) Traditional trado which means “hand over” 2) Anonymous (a) Sophocles wrote the play Oedipus but not the myth of Oedipus (b) Led to contrast between mythos (“story” or “myth”) and logos (“account”) 3) Oral transmission leads to continuous change in story (a) May emphasize different motives or aspects of the story II) Types of Myth A) Divine Myth 1) Sometimes called “true myths” or “myths proper”
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course CLT 3370 taught by Professor Eaverly during the Fall '06 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter 1 Outline - Chapter 1 The Nature of Myth I What is a myth A Term myth 1 Mythos originally meant"authoritative speech"story or"plot 2 Myth a

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