November 16 - November 16, 2007 Philip and Alexander of...

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November 16, 2007 Philip and Alexander of Macedon and the Spread of Greek Culture Ancient Macedon(ia) o Unstable and relatively insignificant kingdom before 4 th century o Weak ties to Greek world Not considered completely Greek by southern Greeks “Medizers” during Persian Invasion (Alexander II and Mardonios) Macedonian Society o Distinctive culture Dialect, tumulus burials, unmixed wine, royal polygamy Powerful monarchy: personal allegiance (treaties, etc.) Warrior aristocracy loyal to king (not state, laws etc.) o Hellenization Only among upper classes in the few urban centers Patrons of Greek artists (ex: Euripides) o Increasing role in Greek politics Export of grain to Athens and potential control N. Aegean grain Century of inter-Greek war creates opportunities Problem: internal strife nearly destroys Macedon in early 4 th century Philip II of Macedon (ca. 382-36 BCE): early years o Early Years Son and brother of kings Exiled during civil wars to Epaminondas’ Thebes (369-7) Takes power in 360 after death of brother in battle Consolidates Macedonian control of NW Aegean o Reforms Goal: stabilize the archaic Macedonian government and army Influence of Epaminondas Military reforms Macedonian phalanx: longer spears, looser ranks
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course CLA 2100 taught by Professor Marks during the Fall '07 term at University of Florida.

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November 16 - November 16, 2007 Philip and Alexander of...

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