Lecture 16 - Emotional Communication

S i s n n r c o e t d o a n v i s i t n s e o o f e a

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Unformatted text preview: 3 Happiness • Conveys messages of enjoyment, pleasure, friendliness • Lip Corners are raised, eyes crinkled • The evidence is in the eyes – The “enjoyment smile” vs. “non-enjoyment smile” Sadness/Distress • Conveys messages of loss, pain bereavement, distress • Characterized by raising of inner brow, closing of eyes or eyes crinkled, downturn of lip corners, sometimes chin is raised 14 Surprise • Usually occur in response to something new or an unexpected event • Raising of eyebrows, opening of eyes, dropping of jaw, parting of lips s g n i l e e f e u r t r i e h t e e d i f y h l o l a t e g r s n i i e y r n t s o e i m e n s s n o i s t u r t e h t g n i l l e t e b t o n y a m e n o o e s u e g h o e n m e p g x i t m w e c r s a e t o r p o o k o s s o a c s e L i M t o t H H a f I h T • e – l – i – n • g • 15 Micro - Expressions • Micro-expressions: emotional expressions that occur in fractions of seconds. These are very difficult to detect in real-time, but provide valuable insight into true feelings of emotion. Using Facial Coding • Development of Facial Action Coding System (FACS) by Ekman & Friesen • 44 muscle Actions Units • Categorized every way the muscles moved to create and objective scientific method of facial coding 16 What is the purpose of facial coding? • Can we inhibit expression? • It’s difficult to fake emotions • It’s difficult to cover emotions • Miss America, Miss Teen USA What is facial coding used for? • Social Psychological Research • Focus Groups/Market Research • Interviewing • Deception Research • National Security Contexts 17 18 . s g n i l e e f r i e h t r e v o n u c m e h t p l e h o t n o i t o m e s r ’ e n t r a p e h t n o s u o F c . y r o t s a l l e t r o d a m e h l e b w o r m p r e i l b e h o t r p e r l v a o l i s m o i t s y a r o e t a r t n e n o o c e r p n o r e i t t n c I a . f l o a o t s e s n o p s e r n w o u t o o e d b n n n t e a o D r a p s p S u c e n t t r . n . t s i r u t o o c m a e e g n i s o l o e e h c f s d i n o a n h w o r i t e a n t u r t a i s p e r h u • • • t o y o t h t a p m e r o t r o p p u s e d i v o r p r o , n o i t o m e r u o y d y e s u a c t a h w f i t n e d i – n o i t o m e e h t o t d n o p s e – R y ? r e e g h g i t r t y e h h t w s e n a i w m t r e a t h e w d – o t t t n x e e s t e r n p o s c i e n h o t i e t o z m l a e n – A y . e h t f i t n e d i l y n s g n i i t l t c e r r o c d n a s r e h t o r n o o f i l t e o s m r e u o y i e e e e s o s ’ F t e r e y l b h a t e b – w O o n n o i K t o m s / e g n i e l h t e e e z i n r F g u o o c e R w Y – o n • K...
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2014 for the course COM 225 taught by Professor Desryaud during the Spring '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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