Lecture 14 & 15 - Active Listening & Social Support

Involvement in a range of social activities or social

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: le Support: Support we provide someone that he/she isn’t aware of. • Why? Costs of receiving social support (face threats) • Problems: lack of reciprocity 32 16 10/9/2012 Social Support: Special Issues Reciprocity • Reciprocity of social support is one of the greatest predictors of relational satisfaction. • Checklists. • What does this mean for invisible support? 33 Social Support: Key Terms Optimal Matching • Social support is effective when it meets the coping needs of the situation at hand. – For example, offering someone money (tangible support) when their dog just got run over by a car (emotional trauma) is not a good match. – Giving them money when their car breaks down, however, might be a great match. • Social support’s effectiveness depends on who is giving it. – Ex: support groups. 34 17 10/9/2012 Social Support: Special Issues Advice • Something we are quick to give when someone has a problem. • Why are we so quick to give it? • Labeled as both one of the most helpful and most UNHELPFUL forms of attempted support. • Keep this in mind : Are the looking for advice? 35 Social Support: Special Issues Timing • The placement of advice affects how we interpret the message. • “You know, you should stop eating as much fast food and start exercising more. Maybe walking.” 36 18 10/9/2012 • 37 38 19 10/9/2012 Hierarchy of Comforting Strategy Sophistication (Burleson, 1984) • Sophisticated (good) comforting messages are all about how you address the other person’s feelings. Burleson explains that the effectiveness of comforting messages can be judged by three attributes, specifically, comforting messages are effective to the extent they EXPLICITLY: (1) Acknowledge, (2) Legitimate, (3) Elaborate on the distressed person’s feelings. 39 Performing each of these actions leads to the following outcomes: Projects a greater degree of involvement with distressed others and their problems. Evaluative positive. More feeling centered. Generally more accepting of the distressed other. Cognitively oriented explanation of feelings (may help distressed person process through and gain insight on their situation). 40 20 10/9/2012 • Don’t ignore the emotions. • Don’t chastise or ridicule someone for feeling the way they do. • Don’t try to distract them or take their mind off the problem. • Don’t talk around the emotions (e.g., “that sucks.”). 41 So, how well does a message EXPLICITLY: Acknowledge Legitimate Elaborate 42 21...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern