Chapter 9 - Prejudice

Group serving bias explaining away outgroup members

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Unformatted text preview: gorization: Classifying People into Groups Perceived similarities and differences Outgroup homogeneity effect Perception of outgroup members as more similar to one another than are ingroup members Own- race bias Tendency for people to more accurately recognize faces of their own race What Are the Cogni<ve Sources of Prejudice? Distinctiveness: Perceiving People Who Stand Out Distinctive people Feeds on self- consciousness Stigma consciousness Person’s expectation of being victimized by prejudice or discrimination What Are the Cogni<ve Sources of Prejudice? Distinctiveness: Perceiving People Who Stand Out Vivid cases Given limited experience with a particular social group, we recall examples of it and generalize Can prime the stereotype What Are the Cogni<ve Sources of Prejudice? Distinctiveness: Perceiving People Who Stand Out Distinctive events foster illusory correlations Stereotypes assume a correlation between group membership and individuals’ presumed characteristics Attentiveness to unusual occurrences can create illusory correlations What Are the Cogni<ve Sources of Prejudice? Attribution: Is It a Just World? Group- serving bias Explaining away outgroup members’ positive behaviors; also attributing negative behaviors to their dispositions Just- world phenomenon Tendency of people to believe that...
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2014 for the course PSY 331 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '06 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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