Chapter 9 - Prejudice

Social identity theory feeling superior to others

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Unformatted text preview: The Scapegoat Theory Displaced aggression Hate crimes Realistic group conflict theory Prejudice arises from competition between groups for scarce resources What Are the Mo<va<onal Sources of Prejudice? Social Identity Theory: Feeling Superior to Others The “we” aspect of our self- concept; the part of our answer to “ Who am I?” that comes from our group memberships We categorize We identify We compare What Are the Mo<va<onal Sources of Prejudice? Social Identity Theory: Feeling Superior to Others Ingroup bias Tendency to favor one’s own group Because of our social identifications, we conform to our group norms When our group succeeds, we feel better by identifying strongly with it What Are the Mo<va<onal Sources of Prejudice? Social Identity Theory: Feeling Superior to Others Need for status, self- regard, and belonging Terror management People’s self- protective emotional and cognitive responses when confronted with reminders of their mortality What Are the Mo<va<onal Sources of Prejudice? Motivation to Avoid Prejudice Motivation to avoid prejudice can lead people to modify their thoughts an actions Self- conscious people will feel guilt and try to inhibit their prejudicial response What Are the Cogni<ve Sources of Prejudice? Categorization: Classifying People into Groups Spontaneous categorization Social identity theory implies that those who feel their social identity keenly will concern themselves with correctly categorizing people as us or them Necessary for prejudice What Are the Cogni<ve Sources of Prejudice? Cate...
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This note was uploaded on 02/03/2014 for the course PSY 331 taught by Professor N/a during the Spring '06 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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