Module06_ColorFlavorTexture

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Click icon to add picture Module 6 Introductory Food Science Color Flavor & Texture Food Chemistry – Part 3
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Chapter 6 - Objectives List the five major natural Pigments associated with food State the chemical classification of plant pigments and give examples from the different categories Explain the color chemistry of red meat and plant extracts Define food colorants, certified colorants and exempt colorants; distinguish between dye and a lake Recognize the nine certified FDA approved food colorants Discuss certification process of food colorants Discuss various methods of color measurement Discuss flavor chemistry, naming the four basic taste plus umami Explain the concept of reaction, process and enzyme type flavors
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Chapter 6 – Objectives  (cont.) Explain flavor enhancers giving examples Discuss flavor encapsulation Explain the common methods of flavor measurements Give examples of flavor deterioration that commonly occurs in food Discuss the importance of texture Explain how texture is measured Define rheology Discuss the influence of water, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids on texture Explain newtonian and non-newtonian food system including examples
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Food Quality Safety Nutritional content Appearance Price is usually a reflection of quality Consumers usually judge quality based on the senses sight, taste, smell and touch How Do we define Quality?
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Standards of Quality FDA - mandatory (21 CFR) Regulations Minimum quality standards and standards of identity Ice cream, mayonnaise, margarine, catsup USDA – mandatory and optional Regulation over meat and poultry Subjective evaluation of quality
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Quality Control Lots and lots of jobs in the food industry in QC Ensure quality of finished product by inspecting at several important control points Raw materials In-line processing Final product Storage
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Food Quality Consumers judge quality using their senses Appearance (sight) color, shape, defects, etc. Taste Sweet, sour, bitter, salty Texture crispiness, smoothness, crunchy
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Quality Control Quality control Objective testing for quality (varies with each commodity) Quality control charts - plot quality testing over time Establish control limits Red = out of control Yellow = use caution Green = average 0 20 40 60 80 100 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8
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Appearance Size and shape Size is easily measured Weight Count (per box) Visually Automated sorters Shape is more difficult to measure
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Appearance Color Very important Several ways to measure Instrumental Sensory panel
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Appearance Color Spectrophotometer for liquids – light absorbed Tristimulus colorimeters = measure light reflected from food L – Lightness to Darkness a - Red to Green b - Yellow to Blue
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