L18a-c_Unit_7a-3_ALL[1]

L18a-c_Unit_7a-3_ALL[1]

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Unformatted text preview: periodic table has a specific mass number This is DIFFERENT for different elements Exam 3: States of Ma/er and Chemical Reac9ons Unit 7: Stoichiometry Lecture 18b: Defining the MOLE (Video lecture part 2) What is the Mole? (part 1) The mole is a unit that represents 2 things: 1.  A specific number of par9cles (atoms, molecules) 1 mole = 6.023 x 1023 par9cles 2.  A definite and specific mass of a substance Each element on the periodic table has a specific mass number ! this number represents the number of grams in 1 mole The Mole and Avogadro’s Number The mole is a unit that represents 2 things: 1.  A specific number of par9cles (atoms, molecules) 1 mole = 6.023 x 1023 par9cles Consider the water molecule: H2O 1 mole of water contains 6.023 x 1023 water molecules 2 moles of water contains 12.046 x 1023 water molecules 1 mole of ANYTHING will contain 6.023 x 1023 parts This is called Avogadro’s number It is the SAME for all elements and compounds Avogadro’s # as a conversion factor 1 mole = 6.023 x 1023 par9cles We can use Av# to convert between the number of moles of a substance and the number of par9cles it contains For any element or compound, we can connect the number of moles to the number of par9cles by using Avogadro’s number as a conversion factor: Number of moles Number of par9cles Avogadro’s # as a conversion factor 1 mole = 6.023 x 1023 par9cles Number of moles Number of par9cles How many Copper atoms are there in a sample of copper that...
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2014 for the course CHEM 102 taught by Professor Peterpastos during the Fall '08 term at CUNY Hunter.

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