Fahrenheit 451 and Dandelion Wine Paper - 1 Quigley AP English Literature and Composition Fantasy and Realism An Examination of the Fantastic in

Fahrenheit 451 and Dandelion Wine Paper - 1 Quigley AP...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 10 pages.

1 Quigley AP English Literature and Composition June 10 , 2011 Fantasy and Realism: An Examination of the Fantastic in Fahrenheit 451 and Dandelion Wine Ray Bradbury was born and raised in Waukegan , Illinois , a small , iconic Midwestern town . This town , as well as Bradbury’s experiences there , serves as a basis for the setting and plot of Bradbury’s novel Dandelion Wine . Throughout this novel , he illustrates the many traditional values that were impressed upon him as a young boy . In his earlier novel , Fahrenheit 451 , Bradbury conveys the widespread fear of communism and censorship that was felt in America in the 1950s , while also demonstrating the values of this time period . In both novels , Bradbury uses fantastical elements to tell realistic stories that reflect the values that he has acquired throughout his life . Dandelion Wine , although written in 1957 , is set in the summer of 1928 in fictional Green Town , Illinois . When writing the novel at age 37 , Bradbury drew upon his childhood experiences in Waukegan , Illinois . Dandelion Wine follows Douglas Spaulding , a 12-year-old boy , and his family , friends , and neighbors as they pass the summer in Green Town , a town that aims to amaze and fascinate , rather than pretend to
2 be normal (Merritt) . Douglas , the main character in the story , is loosely based upon a younger Bradbury . As the Bradbury family did , the Douglas and his family live next door to his grandparents . Some of Bradbury’s most treasured memories of Waukegan stem from the various rituals that his family performed each year . In the novel , young Douglas documents similar rituals of summer on a nickel tablet under the heading “Rites and Ceremonies , ” and writes how he feels about the ritual under the heading “Discoveries and Revelations” ( Dandelion Wine 27 ). Douglas describes the rituals to his brother Tom , saying that it’s “every year the same things , same way , no change no difference . That’s one half of summer , Tom . ( DW 26 ). He goes on , saying that , after a ritual has been performed , “you think about it , and whatever you think , crazy or not , you put under Discoveries and Revelations , ( DW 27 ). Douglas’s nickel tablet reappears throughout the novel , emphasizing the impact that Bradbury’s childhood traditions had on him . In Dandelion Wine , Bradbury employs several fantastic elements to further his otherwise realistic story . One example of this is when Grandpa Spaulding’s neighbor brings over a few flats of a new type of grass that never needs to be cut .

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture