Lecture 10 Glycolysis then membranes

Lecture 10 Glycolysis then membranes - Lecture 10...

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Lecture 10 Glycolysis Substrate level phosphorylation Fermentation Regulation Glycolysis vs. gluconeogenesis Membranes Basic functions Membrane lipids Fluidity
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Key Points About Glycolysis (So Far) Most of the reactions are close to equilibrium under conditions found in the cell, but three energy releasing steps drive the pathway forward Conversion of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate maintains the gradient of glucose always high on outside and low inside and traps the glucose inside the cell (as G-6-P) Both of the ATP utilization steps are irreversible
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Two steps of substrate level phosphorylation 0
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End of Glycolysis 0 End product is pyruvate, 2/glucose
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Glycolysis requires supply of NAD + Electron acceptor for step 6 Under aerobic conditions, NADH is oxidized by the electron transport chain (in mitochondrion) Under anaerobic conditions, must be replenished without oxygen Fermentation In yeast produces alcohol In muscle produces lactic acid 0
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Fates of Pyruvate 0 Fermentation Anaerobic Move to mitochondrion Aerobic oxidation via TCA cycle and electron transport
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Lecture 10 Glycolysis then membranes - Lecture 10...

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