Between+XX+and+XY:+Intersexuality+and+the+myth+of+two+sexes

Grumbach m and conte f disorders of sexual

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Unformatted text preview: Now 3, http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2006/302/3 (requires registration). 17. Gage, F H. 2000. “Mammalian Neural Stem Cells.” Science 287 (5457): . 1433–1438. 18. Bukovsky, A., et al. 2005. “Oogenesis in Adult Mammals, Including Humans: A Review.” Endocrine 26 (3): 301–316; Bukovsky, A., Svetlikova, M., and Caudle, M. R. 2005. “Oogenesis in Cultures Derived from Adult Human Ovaries.” Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology 3: 17. 19. Brisson, L., Sexual Ambivalence: Androgyny and Hermaphroditism in GraecoRoman Antiquity (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002). 20. Ibid. 21. Ellis, A. 1945. “The Sexual Psychology of Human Hermaphrodites.” Psychosomatic Medicine 7: 108–125. 22. Money, J., Hampson, J. G., and Hampson, J. L. 1955. “An Examination of Some Basic Sexual Concepts: The Evidence of Human Hermaphroditism.” Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital 97 (4): 301–319. 23. Money, J., Hampson, J. G., and Hampson, J. L. 1955. “Hermaphroditism: Recommendations Concerning Assignment of Sex, Change of Sex and Psychologic Management.” Bulletin of the Johns Hopkins Hospital 97 (4): 284–300. 24. Meyer-Bahlburg, H. F 1999. “Gender Assignment and Reassignment in . 46,XY Pseudohermaphroditism and Related Conditions.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 84 (10): 3455–3458. Endnotes 167 25. Phoenix, C. H., et al. 1959. “Organizing Action of Prenatally Administered Testosterone Propionate on the Tissues Mediating Mating Behavior in the Female Guinea Pig.” Endocrinology 65: 369–382. 26. Ehrhardt, A. A., Evers, K., and Money, J. 1968. “Influence of Androgen and Some Aspects of Sexually Dimorphic Behavior in Women with the Late-Treated Adrenogenital Syndrome.” Johns Hopkins Medical Journal 123 (3): 115–122; Ehrhardt, A. A., Epstein, R., and Money, J. 1968. “Fetal Androgens and Female Gender Identity in the Early-Treated Adrenogenital Syndrome.” Johns Hopkins Medical Journal 122 (3): 160–167. 27. Saez, J. M., et al. 1971. “Familial Male Pseudohermaphroditism with Gynecomastia Due to a Testicular 17-ketosteroid Reductase Defect. I. Studies in Vivo.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 32 (5): 604–610; Saez, J. M., et al. 1972. “Further in Vivo Studies in Male Pseudohermaphroditism with Gynecomastia Due to a Testicular 17-ketosteroid Reductase Defect (Compared to a Case of Testicular Feminization).” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 34 (3): 598–600; Goebelsmann, U., et al. 1973. “Male Pseudohermaphroditism Due to Testicular 17-hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase deficiency.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 36 (5): 867–879. 28. Imperato-McGinley, J., et al. 1974. “Steroid 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency in Man: An Inherited Form of Male Pseudohermaphroditism.” Science 186 (4170): 1213–1215; Imperato-McGinley, J., et al. 1979. “Male Pseudohermaphroditism Secondary to 5-Alpha Reductase Deficiency—A Model for the Role of Androgens in Both the Development of the Male Phenotype and the Evolution of a Male Gender Identity.” Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 11 (1B): 637–645. Chapter 3: Sex Versus Reproduction 1. Dawkins, R., The Selfish Gene (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1976). 2. Morris, D., The Naked Ape (New York: Dell, 1967). 3. Wescott, R., in Culture: Man’s Adaptive Dimension, ed. A. Montague (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1968). 4. De Waal, F Bonobo: The Forgotten Ape (Berkeley: University of California ., Press, 1997). 5. Savage-Rumbaugh, S., and Wilkerson, B. 1978. “Socio-Sexual Behavior in Pan paniscus and Pan troglodytes: A Comparative Study.” Journal of Human Evolution 7: 327–344. 168 Endnotes Chapter 4: Where Our Sexes Come From: The Abridged Version 1. MacLaughlin, D. T., and Donahoe, P. K. 2004. “Sex Determination and Differentiation.” New England Journal of Medicine 350 (4): 367–378. 2. Grumbach, M. M. 2002. “The Neuroendocrinology of Human Puberty Revisited.” Hormone Research 57 Suppl 2: 2–14. 3. Wilson, J., Foster, D. W., Kronenberg, M. D., and Larsen, R. P., Williams Textbook of Endocrinology (Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1998). 4. Staub, N. L., and De Beer, M. 1997. “The Role of Androgens in Female Vertebrates.” General and Comparative Endocrinology 108 (1): 1–24. Chapter 5: Where Our Sexes Come From: The Rest of the Story 1. Grumbach, M., and Conte, F “Disorders of Sexual Differentiation,” in ., Williams Textbook of Endocrinology, ed. by Wilson, J., Foster, D. W., Kronenberg, M. D., and Larsen, R. P. (Philadelphia: W. B. Saunders, 1998). 2. Klinefelter, H. F Jr., Reifenstein, E. C., Jr., and Albright, F 1942. “Syn., . drome Characterized by Gynaecomastia, Aspermatogenesis Without A-Leydigism and Increased Excretion of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone.” Journal of Clinical Endocrinology 2: 615–627. 3. Chen, H., “Klinefelter Syndrome,” 2005. http://www.emedicine.com/PED/ topic1252.htm. Accessed 2007. 4. Morton, C., Miron, P., “Cytogenetics in Reproduction,” in Repr...
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