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SPE-115816-MS-P - SPE 115816 Monitoring Inflow Distribution...

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SPE 115816 Monitoring Inflow Distribution in Multi-zone, Velocity String Gas Wells Using Slickline Deployed Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Measurements H. Huebsch, M. Moss, and T. Trilsbeck, EnCana, and G. Brown, S. Rogers, and T. Bouchard, Schlumberger Copyright 2008, Society of Petroleum Engineers This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2008 SPE Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition held in Denver, Colorado, USA, 21–24 September 2008. This paper was selected for presentation by an SPE program committee following review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(s). Contents of the paper have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Electronic reproduction, distribution, or storage of any part of this paper without the written consent of the Society of Petroleum Engineers is prohibited. Permission to reproduce in print is restricted to an abstract of not more than 300 words; illustrations may not be copied. The abstract must contain conspicuous acknowledgment of SPE copyright. Abstract Fiber-optic systems are able to generate a temperature log along an optical fiber using a laser source and analysis of the backscattered light. This paper details a novel application of this technology using an optic fiber embedded in a 1/8 th inch slickline cable to calculate the inflow distribution of multi-zone gas wells with velocity strings. EnCana’s multi-zone gas wells in the Deep Basin of Western Canada are often completed with production tubing landed near the lowest perforated interval to act as a velocity string and lift produced water to surface. This completion technique makes spinner production logs impossible to run without initially performing a wellsite operation to lift the tubing shoe above the reservoir, requiring either a workover rig or a snubbing unit. Running a slickline containing an optical fiber to the bottom of the tubing and producing the well up the annulus for a short period allows the temperature profile of the well to be measured and therefore, the inflow distribution of the well can be calculated. Determining the inflow distribution of multi-zone gas wells now becomes a simple slickline operation with no tubing shift required. Additional benefits are the detection of crossflow on shut-in and the measurement of flowing bottomhole pressure when a gauge is run at the end of the slickline. The process is cost effective, less risky than conventional production logging, and the slickline can be safely employed where there is significant surface pressure. The paper uses case studies validated by spinner log comparisons to demonstrate that slickline fiber optic distributed temperature sensor measurements are a viable method for performing reservoir surveillance in multi-zone gas wells with velocity strings in Western Canada. Utilizing fiber optic measurements in these wells reduces operating costs and should
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