Hippolytusworshipsartemisdevotinghimselftoactivitiespr

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(23‐25).

 Thus,
Aphrodite’s
punishment
of
Hippolytus’
impiety
begins
while
Hippolytus
is
engaged
in
 an
act
of
pious
worship.

Finally,
Aphrodite
refers
to
Hippolytus
as
a
“young
man”
(43).

 This
seemingly
incidental
detail
is
soon
revealed
to
be
of
significance.

In
the
next
scene,
 when
Hippolytus
loudly
rejects
his
aged
servant’s
advice
to
show
Aphrodite
respect,
the
 servant
prays
to
Aphrodite
on
his
master’s
behalf:
“If
someone
because
of
his
youth
has
an
 intense
spirit
/
and
speaks
rashly
about
you,
pretend
not
to
hear
him;
/
for
gods
ought
to
be
 wiser
than
mortals”
(118‐120).

As
often
in
drama,
the
humble
figure
of
the
servant
gives
 voice
to
popular
wisdom,
here
that
the
young
are
frequently
rash
in
their
speech
because
of
 the
intensity
of
their
emotions
and
accordingly
are
deserving
of
some
license.

As
we
know
 from
the
prologue,
the
simple
wisdom
of
this
servant
will
not
be
shared
by
Aphrodite.
 Through
the
delineation
of
Hippolytus’
simultaneous
piety
and
impiety
and
through
 the
casual
revelation...
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2014 for the course CLAS 1P95 taught by Professor Dhowes during the Fall '08 term at Brock University, Canada.

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