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Issue Paper:Childhood Sexual Abuse and Social WorkHaley BakerSchool of Social Work, The University of OklahomaS WK 5403-998: Professional Social WorkProfessor O’Reilly
Issue Paper:Childhood Sexual Abuse and Social WorkIntroductionChildhood sexual abuse (CSA) creates not only long-term effects on the victim, but alsofor the family and society at large. Due to the nature of CSA, disclosure is often delayed, or theabuse is never disclosed at all. In the United States, it is estimated that one in five girls, and onein twenty boys, are victims of childhood sexual abuse (“Childhood Sexual Abuse Statistics”,n.d.). Childhood sexual abuse differs from other forms of abuse in the fact that it is often unseen,unspoken, and incredibly private between the perpetrator and the child. Therefore, the actualprevalence of CSA is probably much higher than data show. As defined in The Child AbusePrevention and Treatment Act, sexual abuse pertains to:The employment, use, persuasion, inducement, enticement, or coercion of any child toengage in, or assist any other person to engage in, any sexually explicit conduct orsimulation of such conduct for the purpose of producing a visual depiction of suchconduct; or the rape, and in cases of caretaker or inter-familial relationships, statutoryrape, molestation, prostitution, or other form of sexual exploitation of children, or incestwith children (Children’s Bureau, 2019, p. 40).With this definition, this paper seeks to provide information related to the outcomes of childhoodsexual abuse, including those for the child, family members, and society at large. Outcomes fordifferent populations will be explored as well. This will include exploring different familialfactors in reference to CSA, including caregivers with substance abuse, occurrence rates andoutcomes of minority populations, and in regard to victims of CSA in which their caregiver wasalso victimized by CSA. Furthermore, treatment modalities will be explored on a micro and
macro level. This will include a discussion on Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy,for use with individual clients, and larger systematic implications for Child Protective Servicesand service providers.Statistical Data for CSAIn the Child Maltreatment 2019 report, conducted by the Children’s Bureau, it is statedthat 9.3 percent of substantiated reports included victims of sexual abuse, meaning an estimated61,008 children suffered from CSA in 2019 (p. xi). Of this 9.3 percent, only 7.2 percent ofvictims were victimized solely by sexual abuse (Children’s Bureau, 2021, p. xi). Thus, 92.8percent of CSA victims experience dual victimization in the form of either neglect, physicalabuse, or psychological maltreatment. As mentioned, prior, these statistics come from reportedand substantiated records of CSA. Cases that go undisclosed, uninvestigated, or unsubstantiatedare not included in these statistics. An additional point of importance lies in the perpetrators ofsexual abuse. Ninety percent of children who are victims of CSA know their perpetrator, with

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