Lab1distributionofplantsatmerbleue figure39

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Unformatted text preview: .5 m). Often forms large monospecific stands. Narrow leaves (7‐15 cm long, 2 cm wide), ending in a sharp point. Finely toothed, alternate, and whitened beneath. *spp means “species”. You will observe several species of the Salix genus in Mer Bleue. USDA‐NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 597 Figure 36. Silene vulgaris Maiden’s tears ‐ Silène ou Pétard Perennial herbaceous plant 15‐45 cm tall, branched from its base. White globular bell‐shaped flowers. Source: file Nsr‐slika‐366.png from Wikimedia commons (commons.wikimedia.org). 29 Lab 1 ‐ Distribution of plants at Mer Bleue Figure 37. Solidago spp. Golden Rod (several species) ‐ Verge d’or (plusieurs espèces) 1 Perenial herb 30‐150cm tall Leaves alternate, stackless, lance‐shaped, 6‐13cm long and 0.5‐1.8cm wide Leaves numerous and crowded on stem, margin sharply toothed to toothless Inflorescences: yellow florets (2‐3mm high). Numerous florets (up to 30) on the upper side of flowering branches that often are curved, in triangular cluster Modifié d’après: Chambers, Legasy and Bentley – Forest Plants of Central Ontario – ©1996 Lone Pine Publishing & Queen’s printer. Figure 38. Sphagnum spp. Sphagnum moss (several species) – Sphaigne (plusieurs espèces) 1 BIODIDAC Jon Houseman 30 Small nonvascular (1‐10 cm tall) green plant composed of a head (capitulum, 1.5 cm wide),"stem" and "leaves". Color varies depending on sun exposition (from red‐purple to green). Lab 1 ‐ Distribution of plants at Mer Bleue Figure 39. Spiraea alba/ latifolia White meadowsweet ‐ Spirée blanche Shrub 1‐2 m tall. Small white flowers in narrow panicles (10‐15 cm long) Leaves alternate, crowded, sometimes overlapping Long lanced‐shaped leaves (3‐6 cm long 1‐2 cm wide) : Spirea alba (left) Wide lanced‐shaped leaves (3‐8 cm long 1‐3 cm wide): Spiraea latifolia (right) Spirea alba ‐ Adapted from: Chambers B. Legasy, K and Bentley, C. ‐ Forest plants of central Ontario.p.67 ‐ ©1996 Loner pine publishing, ON. Figure 40. Spiraea latifolia: Adapted from: Chambers B. Legasy, K and Bentley, C. ‐ Forest plants of central Ontario.p.68 ‐ ©1996 Loner pine publishing, ON. Tilia americana Basswood ‐ Tilleul ou Bois blanc Large tree reaching 20 – 25 m in height. Leaves deciduous, alternate and heart‐shaped (10 cm long and 10 cm wide), ending in a sharp point, finely toothed. The base of the leaf is strongly asymmetric. Small (0.5‐1.0 cm in diameter) fruits in clusters on a leaf‐ like bract. Bark is dark and shallowly grooved on mature trees. USDA‐NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 2:512. 31 Lab 1 ‐ Distribution of plants at Mer Bleue Figure 41. Typha latifolia Cattail or Bulrush ‐ Quenouille Herbaceous plant, often growing in dense stands. Leaves are grass‐like (1 ‐ 2.5 m long, 0.6 ‐ 2.5 cm wide). In autumn, a characteristic cigar‐shaped, dark‐brown ear (clusters of flowers) is produced, which eventually liberate fluffy seeds. USDA‐NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 68. Figure 42. Ulmus americana American elm ‐ Orme d'Amérique USDA‐NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 626 32 Large tree reaching 35 m in height. Leaves alternate, about 10‐15 cm long, ending in a sharp point. The base of the leaf is strongly asymmetrical. Upper surface is dark green and rough, while underside is paler and slightly hairy. Bark is dark greyish‐brown, deeply furrowed, becoming spotted with ash‐grey and scaly with age. Lab 1 ‐ Distribution of plants at Mer Bleue Figure 43. Vaccinium myrtilloides Blueberry ‐ Bleuet Shrub (20‐60 cm tall) Leaves alternate and often leathery. Twigs and leaves densely hairy. Toothless leaves Fruit is blue or red. USDA‐NRCS PLANTS Database / Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 2:701. Figure 44. Vicia cracca Cow vetch ‐ Vesce jargeau ou jargeau Perennial plant with climbing stems. Blue or violet flowers. Alternate leaves, almost stalkless, about 2.5 cm long Adapted from: Chambers B. Legasy, K and Bentley, C. ‐ Forest plants of central Ontario. ©1996 Loner pine publishing, ON. 33 Lab 1 ‐ Distribution of plants at Mer Bleue Sampling sites Figure 45. Aerial photograph the Mer Bleue trail. from which you will conduct your observations. Parking lot WC 5 Stream i 1 Walking path Rotations between stations 2 i Boardwalk i 4 3 i i i i Information panel 1 Station 1 – The field 3 Station 3 – The bog Located on a sand dune, this abandoned field is probably the driest habitat. Plants here are exposed to both the sun, receiving lots of light, and to the drying winds. You will find many grasses, numerous perennials and some shrubs. 2 Station 2 – The marsh Home of the cattails, the marsh is a pseudo‐aquatic habitat where water is always available. The inlet stream provides it with nutrients and oxygenates the water. This in turn allows the organic matter to decompose and prevents the accumulation of peat moss. At this location, water is covered by a carpet of sphagnum mosses, shrubs and roots between 1 to 7 metres thick. This water, which is most often found within the sphagnum, is very acidic and poor in oxygen. As a result, decomposition is inhibited. At the bottom of the bog, peat moss accumulates and will eventually fill in the lake. 4 Station 4 – The ecotone On the edge of the bog, close to the marsh, this station represents a transition zone. Drier than the bog and the marsh, the soil allows a better growth of trees, while still remaining acidic. 5 Station 5 – The forest Located on a sandy dune, this station bordering the marsh has well‐drained soil and many trees that form a closed canopy. Reference: Forest Plants of Central Ontario –Chambers, Legasy and Bentley – ©1996 Lone Pine Publishing & Queen’s printer. 34...
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2014 for the course BIO 1130 taught by Professor Fenwick during the Fall '08 term at University of Ottawa.

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