Fdp-4th

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Unformatted text preview: of that place. Thus: 2 is worth two “units” (two “ones”), or 2 (= 2 × 1). 5 is worth five tens, or 50 (= 5 × 10). 4 is worth four hundreds, or 400 (= 4 × 100). We can now write the number 452 as the sum of these products: You should memorize the names of all the place values. 452 = 4 × 100 + 5 × 10 + 2 × 1 6 H U N D R E D B I L L I O N S 9 T E N B I L L I O N S 2 O N E B I L L I O N S 5 H U N D R E D M I L L I O N S 6 T E N M I L L I O N S 7 O N E M I L L I O N S 8 H U N D R E D T H O U S A N D S 9102 T HT E UE N NN DS R E D S T H O U S A N D S T H O U S A N D S 3 U N I T S O R O N E S . 8 T E N T H S 3 H U N D R E D T H S 4 T H O U S A N D T H S 7 T E N T H O U S A N D T H S The chart to the left analyzes the place value of all the digits in the number: 692,567,891,023.8347 Notice that the place values to the left of the decimal all end in “-s,” while the place values to the right of the decimal all end in “-ths.” This is because the suffix “-ths” gives these places (to the right of the decimal) a fractional value. Let us analyze the end of the preceding number: 0.8347 8 is in the tenths place, giving it a value of 8 tenths, or 8 . 10 3 3 is in the hundredths place, giving it a value of 3 hundredths, or ⎯ . 100 4 4 is in the thousandths place, giving it a value of 4 thousandths, or ⎯ . 1000 7 7 is in the ten thousandths place, giving it a value of 7 ten thousandths, or ⎯ . 10,000 To use a concrete example, 0.8 might mean eight tenths of one dollar, which would be 8 dimes or 80 cents. Additionally, 0.03 might mean three hundredths of one dollar, which would be 3 pennies or 3 cents. Manhattan GMAT Prep * 14 the new standard DIGITS & DECIMALS STRATEGY Chapter 1 Using Place Value on the GMAT Some difficult GMAT problems require the use of place value with unknown digits. A and B are both two–digit numbers, with A > B. If A and B contain the same digits, but in reverse order, what integer must be a factor of (A − B)? (A) 4 (B) 5 (C) 6 (D) 8 (E) 9 To solve this problem, assign two variables...
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2014 for the course MIS 304 taught by Professor Mejias during the Spring '07 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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