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2. Afterlife - Why did Amarna occur THREE POSSIBLE REASONS...

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Why did Amarna occur? THREE POSSIBLE REASONS: – to restrict the economic/political/religious power of Amun and the Amun priesthood (Akhenaten assumes functions of Amun) – to implement a new religious idea and promote a new way of thinking / Akhenaten as the driving force – to respond to an external threat by a radical measure (the ravaging epidemic)
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Why did Amarna occur? – to restrict the economic/political/religious power of Amun and the Amun priesthood (Akhenaten assumes functions of Amun) – to implement a new religious idea and promote a new way of thinking / Akhenaten as the driving force – to respond to an external threat by a radical measure (the ravaging epidemic) How did it affect Egypt and whom in Egypt? How widely was the religion implemented and ancient religion prohibited?
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The Egyptian belief in an afterlife
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Belief in the afterlife – among the fundamental concepts of Egyptian culture – visible since late prehistoric times: presence of commodities in the burial – burial practices underwent continuous development until Roman times – paramount importance for the Egyptians inferable from the number of tombs and burials found in the Nile Valley, the most extensive remains preserved from ancient Egypt – most of our knowledge about the afterlife comes from the sphere of the elite – afterlife was a luxury commodity which only the king and the elite could afford
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Different afterlives, depending on preservation of the body Necessity to ensure that one's heirs would mummify the body and carry out the funeral ritual. substitute bodies (cult statues) provision with offerings / continuity of cult – Regular schedule for offerings at the tomb had to be organized. The best way to accomplish this was to set up a mortuary foundation by designating the income from a given parcel of land for that purpose. available tomb equipment magic empowerment (funerary ritual, funerary spells)
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Servant figurines: Ushebti (Shabti, Shawabti)
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In the Egyptian conception, people were as unequal in the afterlife as in earthly life, and existing documents disclose no true interest in what happened to ordinary people after death.
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The sources for the Egyptian afterlife : – the tomb as a building (from the Predynastic period) / the burial – objects the deceased took along into the tomb (from the mid-fifth
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