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But the increased attention that congress and this

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Unformatted text preview: es, foreign governments decline to inspect containers that U.S. authorities deem high -risk. The United States can then order the containers not to be loaded onto the ship at the foreign port or can inspect the container in its U.S. port of arrival. However, even with these options, some high-risk containers go uninspected (U.S. Government Accountability Office, 2005b ). Even full compliance will not guarantee success. As part of the Container Security Initiative, oceangoing ship operators must provide the manifest, or list of the contents of ship cargo, to U.S. officials in advance. However, the carrier has no way of knowing the accuracy of the manifest, since it gets the information from the individual companies shipping the goods. [___] Port security isn’t getting funding Jesse Hereford, Vice Chairman of the Border Trade Alliance, 2012 (May 1, “House Homeland Security Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security Hearing; "Using Technology to Facilitate Trade and Enhance Security at Our Ports of Entry." p://homeland.house.gov/sites/homeland.house.gov/files/Testimony%20-%20Hereford.pdf In port security, much like in aviation, there is no more important technology than an experienced CBPO who can spot an anomaly or identify a traveler who might seek to do us harm. Unfortunately, this vital element of border and port security is growing increasingly hard to come by. Your Subcommittee will get no argument from the trade community and the constituency that the BTA represents that the Border Patrol is not an integral component of our nation's border security strategy. But the increased attention that Congress and this and previous administrations has directed towards Border Patrol has left the agency responsible for security at the ports of entry, Customs and Border Protection, coming up short in the chase for dwindling human and technological resources. 12 | P a g e Port Security Affirmative BDL Answers to: Terrorists Can’t Get Weapons Into Ports [___] [___] Terrorists can use ports as weapons conduits Jon D. Haveman and Howard J. Shatz, Public Policy Institute of California, 2006 (Protecting the Nation’s Seaports: Balancing Security and Costs, www.ppic.org/content/pubs/report/r_606jhr.pdf) The need to secure ports and the supply chain feeding goods into the ports stems from two concerns. The first is that transporting something from one place to another—the very activity that the ports facilitate—is an important activity for terrorists. Terrorists could use a port as a conduit through which to build an arsenal within the nation’s borders. 13 | P a g e Port Security Affirmative BDL Answers to: Port Disruptions Won’t Hurt the Economy [___] [___] Seaports are terrorist targets, attacks disrupt the economy Jon D. Haveman and Howard J. Shatz, Public Policy Institute of California, 2006 (Protecting the Nation’s Seaports: Balancing Security and Costs, www.ppic.org/content/pubs/report/r_606jhr.pdf) Temporarily shutting down a major U.S. port co...
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This document was uploaded on 02/06/2014.

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