Varsity-Packet-Final

None of these groups have pulled off anything on the

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Unformatted text preview: cruitment. In Egypt, Islamists are expected to do well in coming elections. But they are not expected to abrogate the peace treaty with Israel or forcibly Islamicize society. Such pragmatism meets with applause internationally, but it may anger the more radical and idealistic members of these groups. Eventually there will be charges that moderate Islamist leaders are selling out, charges that Zawahiri has already made and will make again. 20 | P a g e Port Security Affirmative BDL Answers to: Al Qaeda Threat Decreasing/Bin Laden Dead [___] [___] Al Qaeda is still a threat – Complacency about Osama’s death increases the risk al Qaeda will rebound Max Boot, National Security at CFR, 2011 (Max, August 8, “A False Sense of National Security” Los Angeles Times, http://www.cfr.org/nationalsecurity-and-defense/false-sense-national-security) U.S. government officials are probably premature when they rush to proclaim, as the Washington Post reported, that Al Qaeda is "on the brink of collapse." Such predictions have been made many times before, and each time have been disproved by this terrorist group with its alarming ability to regenerate itself. It does not take much in the way of resources to carry out a terrorist strike (the Sept. 11 operation cost an estimated $500,000), so Al Qaeda does not need much infrastructure to pose a threat. Moreover, Al Qaeda is not the only terrorist organization we have to worry about. Other Islamist extremists are capable of planning attacks with scant direction or assistance from Al Qaeda Central. These organizations range from Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula and Al Qaeda in Iraq to the Haqqani network, the Afghan Taliban, the Pakistani Taliban, Lashkar-e-Taiba, Hezbollah, Kataib Hezbollah and Hamas. None of these groups have pulled off anything on the scale of Sept. 11, thank goodness, but several of them have undoubtedly killed far more people — and dominated far more territory — than Bin Laden ever did. Al Qaeda in Iraq managed to take over a substantial portion of the Sunni Muslim areas of Iraq before suffering devastating defeats in 2007 and 2008, but it continues to set off bombs . Hamas has taken over the Gaza Strip and is rapidly building up its arsenal. Hezbollah is the most pow erful force in Lebanon and has more missiles than some nation-states. The Pakistani Taliban is steadily undermining the government in Islamabad with one atrocity after another. Lashkar -e-Taiba has almost sparked war between India and Pakistan with its terrorist attacks in India and undoubtedly will strike again. Kataib Hezbollah, along with other Iranian -backed Shiite terrorist groups, is asserting its power in Iraq as the U.S. prepares to withdraw. By focusing too much on Al Qaeda and its charismatic founder — now resting at the bottom of the Arabian Sea — we risk not devoting sufficient resources or attention to these other threats, which are less publicized but ultimately may be just as dangerous. We have already...
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