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Roadsespecially new roadsare definitely not that

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Unformatted text preview: ds to projects beyond "roads and bridges," it's now looking like the states might hijack those funds and try to pour much of the Obama stimulus package money into roads and cars. According to a report by Bloomberg, Missouri plans to spend $750 million of it on highways and nothing on mass transit. Utah would devote 87% of its share to new roads, and Arizona would spend $869 million on highways. Presumably, other states have similar priorities. I'm not unsympathetic to the plight of the state s. Saddled with declining revenues due to the recession and a crumbling road, bridge and airport infrastructure badly in need of repair, they have to do something. In the absence of strong federal leadership into mass transit, they have little choice but to try to maintain what they have. A spokesman for House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee Chairman James Oberstar quoted in the Bloomberg article was blunt: "We like the environmentally friendly way of doing things but the charge we were given was to come up with something that can happen quickly," he said. "We can't lose sight of what the primary goal here is, and that is to put people to work." Not Just Jobs, but the Right Jobs Which brings us to the key point: Instead of seeking "shovel ready" projects that can be started within 180 days to create new jobs ASAP, the Obama team should be looking at the long view on energy and ensuring what we build now is tru ly built to last. Roads—especially new roads—are definitely not that. According to the director of Washington-based Building America's Future, some $16.5 billion in mass transit projects can be started within a year. (By comparison, tens of billions of dollars have already been committed to high-speed electric rail in Europe and Asia.) Those projects should be our immediate national priority, followed by some deep and serious planning for a long-term transportation infrastructure that will survive $150 oil and declining supply. President Roosevelt created just such a planning board as part of the New Deal, which eventually resulted in the interstate highway system. By planning for it now, we could achieve a somewhat orderly transition away from liquid fuels and toward efficient electric transport. We'll still create millions of new jobs, only they'll be theright jobs. Jobs that won't disappear the next time oil spikes. 40 | P a g e Port Security Affirmative Port Security Affirmative BDL Port Security Aff – Table of Contents Summary............................................................................................................................................... 2 Glossary ............................................................................................................................................. 3-4 1AC .................................................................................................................................................... 5-9 Harms Economy Add-On...................................
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This document was uploaded on 02/06/2014.

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