\u201cBleeding Kansas\u201d and the Pottawatomie Massacre, 1856.docx - \u201cBleeding Kansas\u201d and the Pottawatomie Massacre 1856 On the night of the radical

“Bleeding Kansas” and the Pottawatomie Massacre, 1856.docx

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“Bleeding Kansas” and the Pottawatomie Massacre, 1856 On the night of May 24, 1856, the radical abolitionist John Brown, five of his sons, and three other associates murdered five proslavery men at three different cabins along the banks of Pottawatomie Creek, near present-day Lane, Kansas. Brown had been enraged by both the sacking of the anti-slavery town of Lawrence several days before and the vicious attack on Charles Sumner on the floor of the U.S. Senate, in which Representative Preston Brooks, of South Carolina, relentlessly beat Sumner with a cane. The killings at Pottawatomie Creek marked the beginning of the bloodletting of the “Bleeding Kansas” period, as both sides of the slavery issue embarked on a campaign of terror, intimidation, and armed conflict that lasted throughout the summer. In the article/reading it states, supporters of both sides flooded into the territory of Kansas, where violence soon erupted between pro-slavery and anti-slavery settlers.

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