Behavior Across The Lifespan final doc.

Behavior Across The Lifespan final doc. - Behavior Across...

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Behavior Across The Lifespan Rob Boger, Elizabeth Burns, Starla Dussault, Michelle Mantonya, December 14, 2007 American Intercontinental University Online
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Thank you for contacting our company for research into the different personality demographics for use in the marketing of your product. We have included a brief background as to what this theory promulgates as well as analyzed the different stages of personality development and provided you with detailed information about these specific stages. Lastly, we have analyzed three different studies related to this topic area and provided additional information on the studies themselves relate to Erikson’s theory to help understand the theory as it relates to society today. Erik Erikson (1902-1994) popularized a theory of personality development proposing that there is a life-cycle that people go through during their life-time. These events, known as psychosocial crisis, occur throughout the life-cycle from birth until death and pass through eight different stages along the way. In each of these stages, how the individual deals with each of the psychosocial crisis molds their personality. The first stage of Erik Erikson’s life cycle occurs from birth to one and half years of age when children start to gain trust in their parents. When a baby doesn’t gain trust in their parents, they grow up thinking of the world being as inconsistent. According to Davis and Palladino (2007), “Having trust in one’s caregivers and one’s environment is important for developing trust in oneself.” (p. 393). An example of this stage can be seen in the movie The Breakfast Club (1985) with the character named John Bender, played by Judd Nelson. John Bender was a criminal and was sent to detention with five other students from other schools. John
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Bender is like the first stage of Erik Erikson’s life cycle in that he never gained trust from his parents when he was a baby and during his formative years. He grew up thinking that the world was inconsistent and unpredictable; according to Erikson’s theory, this is the reason why he is so troubled. The second stage of Erikson’s life cycle is autonomy versus shame and doubt. According to Davis and Palladino (2007), autonomy is the feeling that we can act independently and that we are in control of our own actions. This stage is about learning, from the ages 1.5 to 3 years of age, the exterior and interior control of the body. Children that begin to develop their own sense of independence start to do things by themselves. An example of this stage can be seen in the movie of Look Who’s Talking (1989) starring Kirstie Alley and John Travolta. This movie is about a mother trying to take care of her son, but is running into some troubles along the way. In the process, Molly, played by Kirstie Alley, falls in love with James, played by John Travolta. Mikey, Molly’s son starts to do things on his own when Molly isn’t noticing and starts to develop a sense of
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Behavior Across The Lifespan final doc. - Behavior Across...

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