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BMKT 312 F13 C6 Review

BMKT 312 F13 C6 Review - BMKT 312 CHAPTER 6 STUDY GUIDE...

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BMKT 312 C6 Study Guide 1 BMKT 312: CHAPTER 6 STUDY GUIDE QUALITATIVE RESEARCH TECHNIQUES 1. What is the difference between research with qualitative data and research with quantitative data? Quantitative data research is defined as research involving the use of structured questions or observations where the response options have been predetermined and a large number of respondents is involved. Quantitative data research often involves a sizeable representative sample of the population, and a formalized procedure for gathering data. The purpose of such research is very specific, and the manager and researcher have agreed that precise information is needed. Data format and sources are clear and well defined, and the presentation of the data that has been gathered follows an orderly procedure, which is largely numerical in nature. In contrast, research with qualitative data research involves collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data by observing what people do and say. Observations and statements are in a qualitative or non-standardized form and open to interpretation. Because of this fact, qualitative data can be quantified but only after a interpretation has taken place. 2. What is meant by an observation technique? What is observed, and why is it recorded? Observation methods are techniques where the researcher relies on his or her powers of observation rather than statistical tools to make sense of the marketing problem at hand. Normally, human behavior is observed. Because our memories are faulty, researchers depend on recording devices such as videotapes, audiotapes, handwritten notes, or some other tangible record of what is observed. When objects or data, instead of humans, need to be observed, researchers use audit. 4. What are the formats of online focus groups? The online focus group, a form of nontraditional focus group, is one in which the respondents and/or the clients communicate and/or observe by use of the Internet. Typically, online focus groups allow the participants the convenience of being seated at their own computers, while the moderator operates out of his or her online focus group company. A variation of the online focus group is one that is conducted in a traditional setting, but the client watches online.
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BMKT 312 C6 Study Guide 2 5. How are focus group participants recruited, and what is a common problem associated with this recruitment?
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