2009 Midterm

100 watermelons occupy a larger volume than 100

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Unformatted text preview: re is the same number of molecules in one mole of any gas. 100 watermelons occupy a larger volume than 100 apples! B) These gases will occupy the same volume because the ideal gas law implies that the size of the molecules is negligible as compared to the distances between them. The ideal gas law applies to all gases and says that one mole occupies the same volume at a given temperature and pressure. C) At high pressures, the gases may start to behave as real gases. Then the volume of one mole of a real gas may be different from the volume of one mole of an ideal gas; however, there will be still no difference between the volumes of one mole of Cl2 and H2 because they are at the same temperature and pressure. D) At high pressures, the gases may start to behave as real gases. However, 50 GPa is not too high a pressure at all and thus the ideal gas law will still apply: one mole of any gas occupies the same volume at a given temperature and pressure. E) At high pressures, the gases may start to behave as real gases. For real gases, the volume occupied by one mole of Cl2 will be greater than that of one mole of H2 because the molecule of Cl2 is larger than the molecule of H2 and the distances between gas molecules are now much smaller so that the effect of the size of gas molecules becomes significant....
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This note was uploaded on 02/13/2014 for the course CHEM 1024 taught by Professor Dr.zhifengding during the Winter '12 term at UWO.

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