experiment6 - Physics 1051 Diffraction Laboratory#6...

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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Diffraction
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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Contents Part I: Objective Part II: Introduction Diffraction Interference Part III: Apparatus and Setup Diffraction Grating Laser Pointer Screen The Geometry General Setup Part IV: The Diffraction Grating Part V: The Experiment Your Plan Collecting Data Graphing the Data Analysis Part VI: Summary
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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Part I: Objective The goal of this experiment is to determine the wavelength of light from a laser pointer. You will be designing your own experiment based on the information given in the following slides.
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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Part II: Introduction Diffraction When light waves hit a barrier with an opening of similar dimensions to the wavelength, the part of the wave that passes through will diffract (spread out).
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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Part II: Introduction Interference When there are multiple openings or slits, the crests and troughs of each diffracted wave interfere constructively and destructively to create a diffraction pattern. This pattern consists of a broad, very bright, central maximum and a number of narrower and less intense maxima, with minima between them. These alternating bands are called fringes .
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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Part II: Introduction Interference A diffraction grating consists of a number of closely spaced slits, perhaps as many as several thousand per millimetre. An idealized grating consisting of only three slits is represented here. P represents a point of constructive interference, ie a bright spot. d P λ d
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Physics 1051 Laboratory #6 Diffraction Part II: Introduction Interference d θ Path length difference, δ d To find the locations of the bright spots we first assume that the screen is far enough away from the grating so that the rays reaching a particular point P are approximately parallel when they leave the grating.
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experiment6 - Physics 1051 Diffraction Laboratory#6...

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