pg. 302-315 - The Judiciary The Selection of Federal Judges...

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The Judiciary pg. 302-315 The Selection of Federal Judges There are over 840 federal judgeships in the U.S. A person holds that job for life. Judicial Appointments Judicial Appointments for federal judges are suggested to the president by the Department of Justice, senators, other judges, the candidate themselves, and lawyers’ associations and other interest groups. - Senatorial courtesy - In federal district court judgeship nominations, a tradition allowing a senator to veto a judicial appointment in his or her state. Senatorial courtesy allows a senator of the president’s political party to veto a judicial appointment in his or her own state. Federal District Court Judgeship Nominations. Although the president officially nominates federal judges, in the past the nomination of federal district court judges actually originated with a senator or senators of the president’s party from the state in which there was a vacancy. In effect, judicial appointments were a form of political patronage. Federal Courts of Appeals Appointments. There are many fewer federal courts of appeals appointments than federal district court appointments-more influential. Because federal appellate judges handle more important matters, (president’s view)
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course PLS 1-275 taught by Professor Sherrill during the Fall '07 term at Miss. College.

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pg. 302-315 - The Judiciary The Selection of Federal Judges...

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