Chap 7 - Prelude to an overbearing chapter In this chapter,...

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Prelude to an overbearing chapter In this chapter, we deal with many scary sounding subjects such as quantum physics and Schrödinger equation Conceptually, the concepts are not hard, and if you work on understanding it, the rules that follow will make more sense. The math that produced the results is harder than anything else in the world, so all you need to concern yourself with is the question, and the answer.
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Electromagnetic Radiation In chapter 6, we talked about heat as a form of energy E.R. is another form of energy, and there are many different kinds, but they all share two things in common The energy is carried in a wave The energy travels at the speed of light (c= 2.9979 *10 8 m/s) λν = c where λ is wavelength, v is frequency, and c is the constant speed of light Note: that v is the Greek letter ‘nu’ It does NOT stand for velocity
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Frequency/Quantized Energy The number of cycles per second (The number of peaks = number of cycles) The energy that a wave of ER carries is directly proportional to its frequency. Interestingly enough, it was found by Max Planck that you cannot have half of a cycle, which implies that the energy carried by ER must have discrete values, or quantum values You can have a frequency of 4.2 Hz (1/s). That just means that every second, 4 waves have completely passed, and a fifth wave is 20% passed. But a half of a wave doesn’t exist in nature.
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We just said that energy was proportional to frequency, or E = hv, h being some constant It turns out that h = 6.63 * 10 -34 J*s, which is known as Planck’s constant This means, if a system is emitting ER radiation at a frequency f, then the amount of energy being lost by the system is ΔE = nhf where n is some integer number. For kicks and giggles, I’ll show you the different
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course CHEM 112 taught by Professor Jones during the Fall '07 term at Stevens.

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Chap 7 - Prelude to an overbearing chapter In this chapter,...

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